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Ships and Science: The Birth of Naval Architecture in the Scientific Revolution, 1600-1800
"Naval architecture was born in the mountains of Peru, in the mind of a French astronomer named Pierre Bouguer who never built a ship in his life." So writes Larrie Ferreiro at the beginning of this
Clippers, yachts, and the false promise of the wave line
John Scott Russell’s 19th-century theory of ship design promised speed and delivered elegance. But, ultimately, it didn’t hold water.
A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF US AND UK FRIGATE DESIGN
The development of a navy ship reflects not only its mission, but the accumulated experience of that navy as expressed in its design standards and practices. This paper examines the differences in
Historical Roots of the Theory of Hydrostatic Stability of Ships
The pohysical principles of hydrostatic stability for floating systems were first pronounced by ARCHIMEDES in antiquity, although his demonstration examples were limited to simple geometrical shapes.
The Effects of Confined Water Operations on Ship Performance: A Guide for the Perplexed
Operations in confined waters (both shallow and width-restricted) are quite different from those in the open ocean, and in some ways are more dangerous. This paper acts as a guide to some of these
SPIES VERSUS PRIZE: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER BETWEEN NAVIES IN THE AGE OF TRAFALGAR
INTRODUCTION: NO SHIP IS AN ISLAND One of the lesser-known ironies of the Battle of Trafalgar is that the Spanish flagship, Santísma Trinidad, was designed by an erstwhile enemy, a British naval
International Naval Technology Transfer: Lessons Learned from the Spanish and Chilean Shipbuilding Experience
Abstract : In 2007 the Spanish shipbuilder Navantia won the contract to rebuild the Australian navy with high-end destroyers and amphibious ships. The same year, the Chilean shipyard ASMAR won the
The Social History of the Bulbous Bow
With our new name for the research note, Inside the Black Box, we highlight the special character (and appeal) of these articles: their tight focus on particular artifacts, historical moments, or
Contested Waterlines: The Wave-Line Theory and Shipbuilding in the Nineteenth Century
TLDR
The article examines how Russell’s theory became accepted by technical experts and the wider public to become the most widely known ship hydrodynamic theory of the 1800s—a reminder of how a persuasive idea can take hold of an entire profession, and even the public, for a long time.
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