• Publications
  • Influence
Inferable Centers, Centering Transitions, and the Notion of Coherence
  • L. Fais
  • Computer Science
  • Computational Linguistics
  • 1 June 2004
TLDR
A centering analysis of the corpus of Japanese e-mail that is examined in this article relies heavily on the inclusion of inferable centers. Expand
  • 17
  • 4
  • PDF
Perception of vowel length by Japanese- and English-learning infants.
This study investigated vowel length discrimination in infants from 2 language backgrounds, Japanese and English, in which vowel length is either phonemic or nonphonemic. Experiment 1 revealed thatExpand
  • 50
  • 2
  • PDF
Now you hear it, now you don't: vowel devoicing in Japanese infant-directed speech.
In this work, we examine a context in which a conflict arises between two roles that infant-directed speech (IDS) plays: making language structure salient and modeling the adult form of a language.Expand
  • 17
  • 2
  • PDF
The Role of Auditory and Visual Speech in Word Learning at 18 Months and in Adulthood.
Visual information influences speech perception in both infants and adults. It is still unknown whether lexical representations are multisensory. To address this question, we exposed 18-month-oldExpand
  • 11
  • 2
Here's looking at you, baby: What gaze and movement reveal about minimal pair word-object association at 14 months
The ability, or lack thereof, of 14-month-old infants to associate novel, minimal pair word-forms with novel objects in a variety of experimental settings has been a crucial research window into howExpand
  • 12
  • 2
  • PDF
Conversation as collaboration: Some syntactic evidence
  • L. Fais
  • Computer Science
  • Speech Communication
  • 3 December 1994
TLDR
This paper presents an attempt to articulate the notion of conversation as collaboration in light of this need. Expand
  • 22
  • 1
Reconstruing U-Shaped Functions
It is refreshing to read an issue devoted entirely to U-shaped developmental functions. These functions, and their N-shaped cousins, have intrigued developmental psychologists for decades becauseExpand
  • 16
  • 1
  • PDF
Age-related changes in sensitivity to native phonotactics in Japanese infants.
Japanese infants at the ages of 6, 12, and 18 months were tested on their ability to discriminate three nonsense words with different phonotactic status: canonical keetsu, noncanonical but possibleExpand
  • 13
  • 1
Japanese Listeners' Perceptions of Phonotactic Violations
The canonical form for Japanese words is (Consonant)Vowel(Consonant) Vowel~. However, a regular process of high vowel devoicing between voiceless consonants and word-finally after voicelessExpand
  • 12
  • 1
  • PDF
Infant Discrimination of a Morphologically Relevant Word-Final Contrast.
Six-, 12-, and 18-month-old English-hearing infants were tested on their ability to discriminate nonword forms ending in the final stop consonants /k/ and /t/ from their counterparts with final /s/Expand
  • 11
  • 1
  • PDF