• Publications
  • Influence
Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Biodiversity
  • L. Fahrig
  • Environmental Science
  • 28 November 2003
■ Abstract The literature on effects of habitat fragmentation on biodiversity is huge. It is also very diverse, with different authors measuring fragmentation in different ways and, as a consequence,
Road Ecology: Science and Solutions
Road ecology is defined as using the science of ecology and landscape ecology to examine, understand, and address the interactions of roads and vehicles with their surrounding environment. This book
Rethinking patch size and isolation effects: the habitat amount hypothesis
  • L. Fahrig
  • Environmental Science
  • 1 September 2013
TLDR
A simpler view of the relationship between habitat distribution and species richness, the ‘habitat amount hypothesis’, is proposed, which replaces two predictor variables, patch size and isolation, with a single predictor variable, habitat amount, when species richness is analysed for equal-sized sample sites rather than for unequal-sized habitat patches.
Functional landscape heterogeneity and animal biodiversity in agricultural landscapes.
TLDR
A framework for solving the problem of to what extent biodiversity can be enhanced by altering landscape pattern without reducing agricultural production is proposed, considering separately compositional heterogeneity ( the number and proportions of different cover types) and configurational heterogeneity (the spatial arrangement of cover types).
Landscape moderation of biodiversity patterns and processes ‐ eight hypotheses
TLDR
This review uses knowledge gained from human‐modified landscapes to suggest eight hypotheses, which it hopes will encourage more systematic research on the role of landscape composition and configuration in determining the structure of ecological communities, ecosystem functioning and services.
Ecological Responses to Habitat Fragmentation Per Se
  • L. Fahrig
  • Environmental Science
  • 6 November 2017
TLDR
Most significant fragmentation effects were positive, irrespective of how the authors controlled for habitat amount, the measure of fragmentation, the taxonomic group, the type of response variable, or the degree of specialization or conservation status of the species or species group.
On the usage and measurement of landscape connectivity
TLDR
It is found that measurements of connectivity provide results that can be interpreted as recommending habitat fragmentation to enhance landscape connectivity, and a new way of quantifying connectivity is suggested, which avoids this problem.
How much habitat is enough
Connectivity is a vital element of landscape structure
In a recent FORUM article, Dunning et al. (1992) put forward a framework of landscape processes that stimulated considerable discussion amongst us. We are in general agreement with their ideas, but
Relative Effects of Habitat Loss and Fragmentation on Population Extinction
TLDR
It is suggested that details of how habitats are arranged cannot usually mitigate the risks of habitat loss, and conservation efforts should be aimed foremost at stopping habitat loss and at habitat restoration.
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