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Solving the Emotion Paradox: Categorization and the Experience of Emotion
  • L. F. Barrett
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Personality and social psychology review : an…
  • 1 February 2006
In this article, I introduce an emotion paradox: People believe that they know an emotion when they see it, and as a consequence assume that emotions are discrete events that can be recognized withExpand
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Are Emotions Natural Kinds?
  • L. F. Barrett
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Perspectives on psychological science : a journal…
  • 1 March 2006
Laypeople and scientists alike believe that they know anger, or sadness, or fear, when they see it. These emotions and a few others are presumed to have specific causal mechanisms in the brain andExpand
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The brain basis of emotion: A meta-analytic review
Abstract Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science. With a surge of studies in affective neuroscience in recent decades, scientists areExpand
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Functional grouping and cortical–subcortical interactions in emotion: A meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies
TLDR
We performed an updated quantitative meta-analysis of 162 neuroimaging studies of emotion using a novel multi-level kernel-based approach, focusing on locating brain regions consistently activated in emotional tasks and their functional organization into distributed functional groups, independent of semantically defined emotion category labels (e.g., "anger," "fear"). Expand
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Core affect, prototypical emotional episodes, and other things called emotion: dissecting the elephant.
What is the structure of emotion? Emotion is too broad a class of events to be a single scientific category, and no one structure suffices. As an illustration, core affect is distinguished fromExpand
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Independence and bipolarity in the structure of current affect.
The independence of positive and negative affect has been heralded as a major and counterintuitive finding in the psychology of mood and emotion. Still, other findings support the older view thatExpand
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How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain
Always Happy Hour—Mary U. Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 American War—Omar El Akkad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 An American Sickness: HowExpand
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Knowing what you're feeling and knowing what to do about it: Mapping the relation between emotion differentiation and emotion regulation
Individuals differ considerably in their emotion experience. Some experience emotions in a highly differentiated manner, clearly distinguishing among a variety of negative and positive discreteExpand
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Interoceptive predictions in the brain
Intuition suggests that perception follows sensation and therefore bodily feelings originate in the body. However, recent evidence goes against this logic: interoceptive experience may largelyExpand
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Psychological resilience and positive emotional granularity: examining the benefits of positive emotions on coping and health.
For centuries, folk theory has promoted the idea that positive emotions are good for your health. Accumulating empirical evidence is providing support for this anecdotal wisdom. We use theExpand
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