L. M. Rainwater

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for their help in preparing this manuscript. Also thanks go to John Quigley, Gary Burtless and Lee Rainwater for many helpful conversations and to Gene Smolensky for longer term inspiration and guidance. The author thanks the Luxembourg Income Study sponsors for their support. The conclusions reached are those of the author.
Acknowledgements The authors are grateful to the UNICEF International Child Development Centre and the Australian Research Grants Council for financial support. They would also like to thank V. J. Verma for his generosity in providing the estimates of European housing costs and poverty rates shown in Section 4 of the paper and and other seminar participants(More)
their help in preparing this manuscript. Also thanks go to Sheldon Danziger for his earlier comments on this manuscript. The authors thank the Institute for Research on Poverty and the Luxembourg Income Study sponsors for their assistance with this paper.
This paper estimates the redistributive effects of welfare state expenditures on children and disparities in the economic well-being of children in ten nations and relates the two. Data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and other sources for cash and non-cash social welfare benefits are used to describe differences in the(More)
middle-income children and poor versus rich children in rich countries. 2 The nations we choose include the four largest predominantly English-speaking countries, Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. To provide a wider European context, we also include Belgium, France, the Netherlands, and Germany, and Finland and Sweden from the(More)
This paper estimates the redistributive effects of welfare state expenditures on social and economic disparities in the economic well-being of citizens in ten nations. Data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and other sources for cash and non-cash social welfare benefits (health and education benefits from third parties)(More)
without blame, for their help in assembling the evidence on cross-national patterns of inequality which underlie this paper. An earlier draft of this paper is available as Luxembourg Income Study Working Paper #157. Katherin Ross and Esther Gray provided excellent assistance in preparing the paper. I assume full responsibility for all remaining errors of(More)
The Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), a research center and microdata archive, was founded in 1983 by Timothy Smeeding, Lee Rainwater, Gaston Schaber and a team of multidisciplinary researchers in Europe. With support from the Luxembourg government, LIS and its staff became an independent non-profit institution in 2002. LIS is organized as a consortium of(More)