L A Blinderman

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The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), which catalyses the transport of triglyceride, cholesteryl ester and phospholipid between phospholipid surfaces, is a heterodimer composed of the multifunctional protein, protein disulphide isomerase, and a unique large subunit with an apparent M(r) of 88K (refs 1-3). It is isolated as a soluble protein(More)
The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a heterodimer composed of the ubiquitous multifunctional protein, protein disulfide isomerase, and a unique 97-kDa subunit. Mutations that lead to the absence of a functional 97-kDa subunit cause abetalipoproteinemia, an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a defect in the assembly and secretion(More)
Cultured Sertoli cells prepared from young rats (13 days old) showed increased incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA, increased production of lactate, and increased incorporation of [3H]leucine into protein in response to micromolar concentrations of insulin and nanomolar concentrations of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The first of these(More)
The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a heterodimer composed of the multifunctional enzyme, protein disulfide-isomerase, and a unique large, 97 kDa, subunit. It is found as a soluble protein within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum of liver and intestine and is required for the assembly of very low density lipoproteins and chylomicrons.(More)
A method is reported for sequencing DNA based on exonuclease III digestion and strand protection by using modified nucleoside triphosphates. Up to 10 kilobases of sequence information may be obtained from each strand of a given template without subcloning. Prior knowledge of the restriction map is not important; prior knowledge of any of the sequence is not(More)
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