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As more clinically relevant cancer genes are identified, comprehensive diagnostic approaches are needed to match patients to therapies, raising the challenge of optimization and analytical validation of assays that interrogate millions of bases of cancer genomes altered by multiple mechanisms. Here we describe a test based on massively parallel DNA(More)
Applying a next-generation sequencing assay targeting 145 cancer-relevant genes in 40 colorectal cancer and 24 non-small cell lung cancer formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens identified at least one clinically relevant genomic alteration in 59% of the samples and revealed two gene fusions, C2orf44-ALK in a colorectal cancer sample and KIF5B-RET(More)
The spectrum of somatic alterations in hematologic malignancies includes substitutions, insertions/deletions (indels), copy number alterations (CNAs), and a wide range of gene fusions; no current clinically available single assay captures the different types of alterations. We developed a novel next-generation sequencing-based assay to identify all classes(More)
We hypothesized that next-generation sequencing could reveal actionable genomic alterations (GAs) and potentially expand treatment options for patients with advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Genomic profiling using next-generation sequencing was performed on hybridization-captured, adapter ligation libraries derived from 28 relapsed and metastatic(More)
One hundred fifty-five biopsy specimens from the gastric mucosa of 81 patients undergoing routine endoscopy procedures were tested for the presence of Campylobacter pylori by three methods: Gram stain, culture, and modified Minitek, a rapid urea disk test (BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.). Twenty-nine patients were infected with C. pylori.(More)
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