Kyle W. Stiegert

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All views, interpretations, recommendations, and conclusions expressed in this document are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the supporting or cooperating organizations. Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for noncommercial purposes by any means, provided that this copyright notice appears on all such copies.
This paper investigates the pricing of patented traits in the U.S. hybrid corn seed market under imperfect competition. In a multiproduct context, we first examine how substitution/complementarity relationships among products can affect pricing. This is used to motivate multi-product generalizations of the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (GHHI) capturing(More)
A central result in the theoretical literature on strategic trade is the ‘rent-shifting hypothesis’, the idea that government’s can employ trade policy as a precommitment device to transfer profit from foreign to domestic firms. To our knowledge, however, the rent-shifting hypothesis remains untested empirically. This paper constructs a theory-based(More)
Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for non-commercial purposes by any means, provided that this copyright notice appears on all such copies. Abstract: This paper investigates bundle pricing under imperfect competition. In a multiproduct context, we first examine how substitution/complementarity relationships among products can affect pricing.(More)
In this paper, we investigate substitution/complementarity relationships among products sold with different bundled characteristics and under different vertical arrangements. Our conceptual model demonstrates the interactive price impacts emanating from product differentiation, market concentration and market size. The model is applied to the U.S.(More)
This research evaluated market power-cost efficiency trade-offs in the U.S. wheat milling industry. The principal findings are that the hypothesis of competition could not be rejected, and increasing concentration has helped to reduce the marketing margin by $0.65/100lbs flour. Social concerns about market power in this industry probably are unwarranted.(More)
The authors thank Kate Hook for her editorial assistance. Any mistakes are those of the authors. Comments are encouraged. All views, interpretations, recommendations, and conclusions expressed in this document are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the supporting or cooperating organizations. Readers may make verbatim copies of this document(More)
The authors thank Kate Hook for her editorial assistance. Any mistakes are those of the authors. Comments are encouraged. All views, interpretations, recommendations, and conclusions expressed in this document are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the supporting or cooperating organizations. Readers may make verbatim copies of this document(More)
The U.S. government awarded export subsidies to agribusiness firms through the Export Enhancement Program (EEP). This study analyzes (a) whether the subsidies promoted new firm market entry and (b) whether firm characteristics influenced program participation. Trade in three commodities, poultry, wheat, and wheat flour, was analyzed using firm-level data.(More)