Kuan-Han Lin

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This study aimed to determine the incidence rates of psychiatric disorders within 1 year after occupational injury and to examine the association between occupational injury and the incidence of psychiatric disorders using National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We used cohort approach in this investigation. All eligible subjects were from the(More)
Introduction This study aimed to investigate the impact of psychological symptoms on return to work (RTW) in workers after occupational injuries. Methods Our study candidates were injured workers who were hospitalized for 3 days or longer and received hospitalization benefits from the Labor Insurance. A self-reported questionnaire including Brief Symptom(More)
INTRODUCTION After a traumatic event, a significant proportion of victims develop psychiatric disorders. Trauma has been an important ailment among workers. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychiatric disorders at three months after occupational injuries. METHODS Our study candidates were(More)
Introduction This study aimed to examine the prevalence rates of both post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression at 12 months in workers experiencing different types of occupational injury in Taiwan. Demographic and injury-related risk factors for psychological symptoms were also evaluated. Methods Our study candidates were injured workers(More)
Risk of suicide has been associated with trauma and negative life events in several studies. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of suicidal ideation, and the population attributable risk among workers after occupational injuries. We investigated workers who had been hospitalized for ≧3 days after occupational injuries between(More)
BACKGROUND Burnout has been described as a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stress on the job that is often the result of a period of expending excessive effort at work while having too little recovery time. Healthcare workers who work in a stressful medical environment, especially in an intensive care unit (ICU), may be(More)
Prior studies have demonstrated important implications related to religiosity and a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) decision. However, the association between patients' religious background and DNR decisions is vague. In particular, the association between the religious background of Buddhism/Daoism and DNR decisions has never been examined. The objective of this(More)
Background:Burnout has been described as a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stress on the job that is often the result of a period of expending excessive effort at work while having too little recovery time. Healthcare workers who work in a stressful medical environment, especially in an intensive care unit (ICU), may be(More)
Few studies have examined the outcome of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) patients in surgical intensive care units (SICUs). This study deliberated the association between a DNR decision and the increased risk of death methodologically and ethically. This study was conducted in three SICUs. We collected patients' demographic characteristics, clinical(More)
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