Kristofer S. J. Pister

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Technological progress in integrated, low-power, CMOS communication devices and sensors makes a rich design space of networked sensors viable. They can be deeply embedded in the physical world and spread throughout our environment like smart dust. The missing elements are an overall system architecture and a methodology for systematic advance. To this end,(More)
Abstract— A method for estimating unknown node positions in a sensor network based exclusively on connectivity-induced constraints is described. Known peer-to-peer communication in the network is modeled as a set of geometric constraints on the node positions. The global solution of a feasibility problem for these constraints yields estimates for the(More)
Large-scale networks of wireless sensors are becoming an active topic of research. Advances in hardware technology and engineering design have led to dramatic reductions in size, power consumption and cost for digital circuitry, wireless communications and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). This has enabled very compact, autonomous and mobile nodes,(More)
D ecreasing computing device size, increased connectivity, and enhanced interaction with the physical world have characterized computing’s history. Recently, the popularity of small computing devices, such as handheld computers and cell phones, burgeoning Internet growth, and the diminishing size and cost of sensors— and especially transistors—have(More)
M ark Weiser envisioned a world in which computing is so pervasive that everyday devices can sense their relationship to us and to each other. They could, thereby, respond so appropriately to our actions that the computing aspects would fade into the background. Underlying this vision is the assumption that sensing a broad set of physical phenomena, rather(More)
Energy Scavenging for Wireless Sensor Nodes with a Focus on Vibration to Electricity Conversion by Shadrach Joseph Roundy Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering University of California, Berkeley Professor Paul K. Wright, Chair The vast reduction in size and power consumption of CMOS circuitry has led to a large research effort based around the(More)
Large-scale networks of wireless sensors are becoming increasingly tractable. Advances in hardware technology and engineering design have led to dramatic reductions in size, power consumption and cost for digital circuitry, wireless communications and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). This has enabled very compact, autonomous and mobile nodes, each(More)
An ultra low power 2.4-GHz transceiver targeting wireless sensor network applications is presented. The receiver front-end is fully passive, utilizing an integrated resonant matching network to achieve voltage gain and interface directly to a passive mixer. The receiver achieves a 7-dB noise figure and 7.5-dBm IIP3 while consuming 330 W from a 400-mV(More)
The OpenWSN project is an open-source implementation of a fully standards-based protocol stack for capillary networks, rooted in the new IEEE802.15.4e Time Synchronized Channel Hopping standard. IEEE802.15.4e, coupled with Internetof-Things standards, such as 6LoWPAN, RPL and CoAP, enables ultra-low power and highly reliable mesh networks which are fully(More)