Kristen L Jurcic Smith

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Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been(More)
Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans triggers formation of granulomas, which are tightly organized immune cell aggregates that are the central structure of tuberculosis. Infected and uninfected macrophages interdigitate, assuming an altered, flattened appearance. Although pathologists have described these changes for over a century, the molecular(More)
Autophagy is a cellular response to intracellular pathogens including mycobacteria and is induced by the direct inhibitors of mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), a major negative regulator of autophagy. Autophagy induction by mTOR inhibition (mTOR dependent autophagy), through chemical means or starvation, leads to mycobacterial killing in infected cells.(More)
Background: The performance of the new ePlex® Respiratory Pathogen (RP) Panel (GenMark Diagnostics) for the simultaneous detection of 19 viruses (influenza A, influenza A H1, influenza A 2009 H1, influenza A H3, influenza B, adenovirus, coronaviruses [HKU1, OC43, NL63, 229E], human rhinovirus/enterovirus, human metapneumovirus, parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3(More)
Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is an intracellular pathogen with several survival mechanisms aimed at subverting the host immune system. Apoptosis has been shown to be mycobactericidal, to activate CD8+ T cells, and to be modulated by mycobacterial proteins. Since few mycobacterial proteins have so far been directly(More)
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