Krista Gigone

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During self-motion, the world normally appears stationary. In part, this may be due to reductions in visual motion signals during self-motion. In 8 experiments, the authors used magnitude estimation to characterize changes in visual speed perception as a result of biomechanical self-motion alone (treadmill walking), physical translation alone (passive(More)
We tested the hypothesis that long-term adaptation to the normal contingencies between walking and its multisensory consequences (including optic flow) leads to enhanced discrimination of appropriate visual speeds during self-motion. In experiments 1 (task 1) and 2 a two-interval forced-choice procedure was used to compare the perceived speed of a simulated(More)
Where do observers direct their attention in complex scenes? Previous work on the cognitive control of fixation patterns in natural environments suggests that subjects must learn where to direct attention and gaze. We examined this question in the context of a change blindness paradigm, where some objects were more likely to undergo a change in orientation(More)
During self-motion, the world normally appears stationary. In part, this may be due to reductions in visual motion signals during self-motion. In eight experiments using magnitude estimation to characterize changes in visual speed perception as a result of biomechanical self-motion alone (treadmill walking), physical translation alone (passive transport)(More)
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