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— We study a problem motivated by cognitive radio in which the primary is a packet system that employs ARQ feedback. A secondary system is allowed to transmit in the same frequency band provided it ensures that the primary attains a specified target rate. That is, the secondary has a certain " interference budget. " The crux of the problem is that the(More)
—The utility of limited feedback for coding over an individual sequence of DMCs is investigated. This study complements recent results showing how limited or noisy feedback can boost the reliability of communication. A strategy with fixed input distribution P is given that asymptotically achieves rates arbitrarily close to the mutual information induced by(More)
Alice and Bob want to share a secret key and to communicate an independent message, both of which they desire to be kept secret from an eavesdropper Eve. We study this problem of secret communication and secret key generation when two resources are available – correlated sources at Alice, Bob, and Eve, and a noisy broadcast channel from Alice to Bob and Eve(More)
Alice and Bob want to share a secret key and to communicate an independent message, both of which they desire to be kept secret from an eavesdropper Eve. We study this problem of secret communication and secret key generation when two resources are available – correlated sources at Alice, Bob, and Eve, and a noisy broadcast channel from Alice to Bob and Eve(More)
This report presents two algorithms for sensor networks that save the energy used when sensors communicate. The first is Information Driven Sensor Querying (IDSQ). This technique uses a utility measure, such as the Mahalanobis distance or mutual information, to limit the number of sensors that need to communicate. The second technique is Distributed Source(More)
— Recently, Shayevitz and Feder introduced an individual sequence formulation of channel coding under model uncertainty and an elegant coding strategy that adapts Horstein's scheme to this setting to achieve the empirical capacity of the channel. Their scheme requires both full-rate output feedback and common randomness. We present a strategy in the style(More)
— In the CEO problem, introduced by Berger et al, IEEE Trans. Info. Theory, 1996, a CEO is interested in a source that cannot be observed directly. M agents observe independently noisy versions of the source and, without collaborating, must encode these across noiseless rate-constrained channels to the CEO. The quadratic AWGN CEO problem refers to the class(More)