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BACKGROUND To determine whether current and former construction workers are at significant risk for occupational illnesses from work at the Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapons facilities, screening programs were undertaken at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Oak Ridge Reservation, and the Savannah River Site. METHODS Medical examination for(More)
Workers in the building, renovation, and demolition of roads and commercial structures in the U.S. suffer a disproportionate share of occupational fatalities and lost-time injuries. Nearly all of the injuries and deaths are preventable. The fatality rate from work-related ailments, such as cancers and silicosis, is believed to be excessive, but is not(More)
There is a growing trend toward new forms of labor-management cooperation, through negotiated agreements involving job-site safety and health, workers' compensation, and preventive medicine (see chapter 14). These developments are likely to change safety and health in the industry. At the same time, they provide opportunities for practitioners and(More)
BACKGROUND Although a large number of Hispanic workers have entered the construction industry, few studies have estimated non-fatal work-related injuries for Hispanic construction workers at a national level. This study examines work-related injury conditions among Hispanic construction workers and assesses disparities between Hispanic and white,(More)
BACKGROUND Medical screening programs were begun in 1996 and 1997 at three Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons facilities (Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Oak Ridge, and the Savannah River Site) to evaluate whether current and former construction workers are at significant risk for occupational illnesses. The focus of this report is pneumoconiosis(More)
BACKGROUND There is convincing evidence that occupational injury and illness rates, particularly those reported by employers in the BLS' Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII), substantially underestimate the true magnitude of injury and illness in the construction industry. METHODS Fifteen years of data from five large nationally(More)
BACKGROUND A study of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among 7,579 current and former workers participating in medical screening programs at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons facilities through September 2008 was undertaken. METHODS Participants provided a detailed work and exposure history and underwent a respiratory examination that(More)
OBJECTIVE To assess medical costs of occupational injuries and sources of payment among Hispanic and non-Hispanic construction workers. METHODS More than 7000 construction workers, including 1833 Hispanic workers were examined using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 1996 to 2002. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using SUDAAN. (More)
This study evaluated occupational deaths resulting from fall injuries among Hispanic construction workers using data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries and the Current Population Survey. The demographics and characteristics of fatal falls among Hispanic workers were examined and compared with that of their white, non-Hispanic counterparts. The(More)
BACKGROUND Medical screening programs at three Departments of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons facilities (Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Oak Ridge, and the Savannah River Site) have included audiometric testing since approximately 1996. This report summarizes hearing evaluations through March 31, 2003. METHODS Occupational examinations included a medical(More)