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Diatoms are unicellular algae with plastids acquired by secondary endosymbiosis. They are responsible for approximately 20% of global carbon fixation. We report the 34 million-base pair draft nuclear genome of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana and its 129 thousand-base pair plastid and 44 thousand-base pair mitochondrial genomes. Sequence and(More)
Diatoms are photosynthetic secondary endosymbionts found throughout marine and freshwater environments, and are believed to be responsible for around one-fifth of the primary productivity on Earth. The genome sequence of the marine centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was recently reported, revealing a wealth of information about diatom biology. Here we(More)
Brown algae (Phaeophyceae) are complex photosynthetic organisms with a very different evolutionary history to green plants, to which they are only distantly related. These seaweeds are the dominant species in rocky coastal ecosystems and they exhibit many interesting adaptations to these, often harsh, environments. Brown algae are also one of only a small(More)
Kelps, brown algae of the order Laminariales, dominate rocky shores and form huge kelp beds which provide habitat and nurseries for various marine organisms. Whereas the basic physiological and ecophysiological characteristics of kelps are well studied, the molecular processes underlying acclimation to different light and temperature conditions are still(More)
Diatoms and other chromalveolates are among the dominant phytoplankters in the world's oceans. Endosymbiosis was essential to the success of chromalveolates, and it appears that the ancestral plastid in this group had a red algal origin via an ancient secondary endosymbiosis. However, recent analyses have turned up a handful of nuclear genes in(More)
Environmental sequencing has revealed unimagined diversity among eukaryotic picoplankton. A distinct picoplanktonic algal group, initially detected from 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences, was hybridized with rRNA-targeted probes, detected by tyramide signal amplification-fluorescent in situ hybridization, and showed an organelle-like body with orange(More)
Coccolithophores have influenced the global climate for over 200 million years. These marine phytoplankton can account for 20 per cent of total carbon fixation in some systems. They form blooms that can occupy hundreds of thousands of square kilometres and are distinguished by their elegantly sculpted calcium carbonate exoskeletons (coccoliths), rendering(More)
MOTIVATION Phylogenomic approaches towards functional and evolutionary annotation of unknown sequences have been suggested to be superior to those based only on pairwise local alignments. User-friendly software tools making the advantages of phylogenetic annotation available for the ever widening range of bioinformatically uninitiated biologists involved in(More)
Emiliania huxleyi, a key player in the global carbon cycle is one of the best studied coccolithophores with respect to biogeochemical cycles, climatology, and host-virus interactions. Strains of E. huxleyi show phenotypic plasticity regarding growth behaviour, light-response, calcification, acidification, and virus susceptibility. This phenomenon is likely(More)
  • Anique Stecher, Stefan Neuhaus, Benjamin Lange, Stephan Frickenhaus, Bánk Beszteri, Peter G Kroth +1 other
  • 2016
Sea ice is a large and diverse ecosystem contributing significantly to primary production in ice-covered regions. In the Arctic Ocean, sea ice consists of mixed multi-year ice (MYI), often several metres thick, and thinner first-year ice (FYI). Current global warming is most severe in Arctic regions; as a consequence, summer sea ice cover is decreasing and(More)