Kimberly Glasgow

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Spoilers—critical plot information about works of fiction that “spoil” a viewer’s enjoyment—have prompted elaborate conventions on social media to allow readers to insulate themselves from spoilers. However, these solutions depend on the conscientiousness and rigor of Internet posters and are thus an imperfect system. We create an automatic alternative that(More)
Semantic textual similarity (STS) systems are designed to encode and evaluate the semantic similarity between words, phrases, sentences, and documents. One method for assessing the quality or authenticity of semantic information encoded in these systems is by comparison with human judgments. A data set for evaluating semantic models was developed consisting(More)
Social media offer a real-time, unfiltered view of how disasters affect communities. Crisis response, disaster mental health, and—more broadly—public health can benefit from automated analysis of the public's mental state as exhibited on social media. Our focus is on Twitter data from a community that lost members in a mass shooting and another(More)
In the aftermath of disasters, communities struggle to recover from the physical and emotional tolls of the event, often without needed social support. Social media may serve to bridge the distance between the affected community and those outside who are willing to offer support. This exploratory study uses Twitter as a lens for examining gratitude for(More)
Disasters have devastating effects on communities, which struggle to recover without sufficient social support. This exploratory study uses Twitter as a lens for examining gratitude for support provisions in the aftermath of disasters. Gratitude for support is examined in the context of two major disasters in the United States, the 2012 mass shooting at(More)
In the aftermath of a traumatic mass casualty event, a community's resources are strained, while its needs for tangible, emotional, and informational support are elevated. Social media may serve to bridge the distance between the locally affected community and those outside who are willing to offer support. This exploratory study uses Twitter as a lens for(More)
Social media, such as microblogging, is a potentially powerful medium through which the city and its citizens can connect , particularly during times of crisis or extreme events. Yet neither the city nor its citizens are monolithic entities. We propose methods to integrate geographic, topical, and social information and behavior to improve situational(More)
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