Khadeejah A. Ibrahim

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When the core hydrogen is exhausted during stellar evolution, the central region of a star contracts and the outer envelope expands and cools, giving rise to a red giant. Convection takes place over much of the star's radius. Conservation of angular momentum requires that the cores of these stars rotate faster than their envelopes; indirect evidence(More)
New transiting planet candidates are identified in 16 months (2009 May–2010 September) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly 5000 periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1108 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2300. Improved vetting metrics are employed,(More)
We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timingn variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This(More)
We present the discovery of the Kepler-20 planetary system, which we initially identified through the detection of five distinct periodic transit signals in the Kepler light curve of the host star 2MASS J19104752+4220194. From high-resolution spectroscopy of the star, we find a stellar effective temperature Teff = 5455 ± 100 K, a metallicity of [Fe/H] =(More)
Fast core rotation in red-giant stars revealed by gravity-dominated mixed modes Paul G. Beck, Josefina Montalban, Thomas Kallinger, Joris De Ridder, Conny Aerts, Rafael A. García, Saskia Hekker, Marc-Antoine Dupret, Benoit Mosser, Patrick Eggenberger, Dennis Stello, Yvonne Elsworth, Søren Frandsen, Fabien Carrier, Michel Hillen, Michael Gruberbauer, Jørgen(More)
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