Kevin Kyungsuk Park

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The failure of axons to regenerate is a major obstacle for functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS) injury. Removing extracellular inhibitory molecules results in limited axon regeneration in vivo. To test for the role of intrinsic impediments to axon regrowth, we analyzed cell growth control genes using a virus-assisted in vivo conditional(More)
Despite the essential role of the corticospinal tract (CST) in controlling voluntary movements, successful regeneration of large numbers of injured CST axons beyond a spinal cord lesion has never been achieved. We found that PTEN/mTOR are critical for controlling the regenerative capacity of mouse corticospinal neurons. After development, the regrowth(More)
Axon regeneration failure accounts for permanent functional deficits following CNS injury in adult mammals. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In analyzing axon regeneration in different mutant mouse lines, we discovered that deletion of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) in adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) promotes robust(More)
Failure of axon regeneration after central nervous system (CNS) injuries results in permanent functional deficits. Numerous studies in the past suggested that blocking extracellular inhibitory influences alone is insufficient to allow the majority of injured axons to regenerate, pointing to the importance of revisiting the hypothesis that diminished(More)
A formidable challenge in neural repair in the adult central nervous system (CNS) is the long distances that regenerating axons often need to travel in order to reconnect with their targets. Thus, a sustained capacity for axon regeneration is critical for achieving functional restoration. Although deletion of either phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN),(More)
Normal visual function in humans is compromised by a range of inherited and acquired degenerative conditions, many of which affect photoreceptors and/or retinal pigment epithelium. As a consequence the majority of experimental gene- and cell-based therapies are aimed at rescuing or replacing these cells. We provide a brief overview of these studies, but the(More)
How axon regeneration is controlled in both PNS and CNS remains elusive. Mechanistic studies of axon growth during development and axon regeneration after injury reveal the PTEN dependent molecular mechanism as a commonality. This pathway could impact the processes occurring in the neuronal soma, such as mTOR-regulated protein translation, and in the axons,(More)
We have shown previously that intraocular elevation of cAMP using the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (CPT-cAMP) failed to promote axonal regeneration of axotomized adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) into peripheral nerve (PN) grafts but significantly potentiated ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)-induced axonal regeneration. Using the PN graft(More)
Injury to the CNS leads to formation of scar tissue, which is important in sealing the lesion and inhibiting axon regeneration. The fibrotic scar that comprises a dense extracellular matrix is thought to originate from meningeal cells surrounding the CNS. However, using transgenic mice, we demonstrate that perivascular collagen1α1 cells are the main source(More)
Injured adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) regrow axons into peripheral nerve (PN) grafted onto cut optic nerve. Survival and regeneration of RGCs is increased by intraocular injections of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and axonal regeneration is further enhanced by co-injection of a cyclic AMP analogue (CPT-cAMP). Based on these data, and because(More)