Learn More
The spindle checkpoint regulates the cell division cycle by keeping cells with defective spindles from leaving mitosis. In the two-hybrid system, three proteins that are components of the checkpoint, Mad1, Mad2, and Mad3, were shown to interact with Cdc20, a protein required for exit from mitosis. Mad2 and Mad3 coprecipitated with Cdc20 at all stages of the(More)
The ERD2 gene, which encodes the yeast HDEL (His-Asp-Glu-Leu) receptor, is essential for growth (Semenza, J. C., K. G. Hardwick, N. Dean, and H. R. B. Pelham. 1990. Cell. 61:1349-1357; Lewis, M. J., D. J. Sweet, and H. R. B. Pelham. 1990. Cell. 61:1359-1363). SED5, when present in multiple copies, enables cells to grow in the absence of Erd2p. Sequence(More)
The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents cells from initiating anaphase until the spindle has been fully assembled. We previously isolated mitotic arrest deficient (mad) mutants that inactivate this checkpoint and thus increase the sensitivity of cells to benomyl, a drug that interferes with mitotic spindle assembly by depolymerizing microtubules. We have(More)
The spindle assembly checkpoint keeps cells with defective spindles from initiating chromosome segregation. The protein kinase Mps1 phosphorylates the yeast protein Mad1p when this checkpoint is activated, and the overexpression of Mps1p induces modification of Mad1p and arrests wild-type yeast cells in mitosis with morphologically normal spindles. Spindle(More)
The spindle checkpoint ensures proper chromosome segregation by delaying anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. We investigated the role of the fission yeast bub1 gene in spindle checkpoint function and in unperturbed mitoses. We find that bub1(+) is essential for the fission yeast spindle checkpoint response to(More)
The spindle checkpoint delays the metaphase to anaphase transition in response to defects in kinetochore-microtubule interactions in the mitotic apparatus (see [1] [2] [3] [4] for reviews). The Mad and Bub proteins were identified as key components of the spindle checkpoint through budding yeast genetics [5] [6] and are highly conserved [3]. Most of the(More)
We show that MAD3 encodes a novel 58-kD nuclear protein which is not essential for viability, but is an integral component of the spindle checkpoint in budding yeast. Sequence analysis reveals two regions of Mad3p that are 46 and 47% identical to sequences in the NH(2)-terminal region of the budding yeast Bub1 protein kinase. Bub1p is known to bind Bub3p(More)
The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance system acting in mitosis to delay anaphase onset until all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle. When the checkpoint is activated, the Mad2 and Mad3 proteins directly bind and inhibit Cdc20, which is an essential activator of an E3 ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC).(More)
Mitotic progression is controlled by proteolytic destruction of securin and cyclin. The mitotic E3 ubiquitin ligase, known as the anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C), in partnership with its activators Cdc20p and Cdh1p, targets these proteins for degradation. In the presence of defective kinetochore-microtubule interactions, APC/C(Cdc20) is(More)
Mitotic progression is driven by proteolytic destruction of securin and cyclins. These proteins are labeled for destruction by an ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase (E3) known as the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C). The APC/C requires activators (Cdc20 or Cdh1) to efficiently recognize its substrates, which are specified by destruction (D(More)