Kevin G. Hardwick

Learn More
The spindle checkpoint regulates the cell division cycle by keeping cells with defective spindles from leaving mitosis. In the two-hybrid system, three proteins that are components of the checkpoint, Mad1, Mad2, and Mad3, were shown to interact with Cdc20, a protein required for exit from mitosis. Mad2 and Mad3 coprecipitated with Cdc20 at all stages of the(More)
The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance system acting in mitosis to delay anaphase onset until all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle. When the checkpoint is activated, the Mad2 and Mad3 proteins directly bind and inhibit Cdc20, which is an essential activator of an E3 ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC).(More)
Chromosome segregation is a complex and astonishingly accurate process whose inner working is beginning to be understood at the molecular level. The spindle checkpoint plays a key role in ensuring the fidelity of this process. It monitors the interactions between chromosomes and microtubules, and delays mitotic progression to allow extra time to correct(More)
The spindle assembly checkpoint keeps cells with defective spindles from initiating chromosome segregation. The protein kinase Mps1 phosphorylates the yeast protein Mad1p when this checkpoint is activated, and the overexpression of Mps1p induces modification of Mad1p and arrests wild-type yeast cells in mitosis with morphologically normal spindles. Spindle(More)
The spindle checkpoint plays a central role in the fidelity of chromosome transmission by ensuring that anaphase is initiated only after kinetochore-microtubule associations of all sister chromatid pairs are complete. In this study, we find that known spindle checkpoint proteins do not contribute equally to chromosome segregation fidelity in Saccharomyces(More)
We show that MAD3 encodes a novel 58-kD nuclear protein which is not essential for viability, but is an integral component of the spindle checkpoint in budding yeast. Sequence analysis reveals two regions of Mad3p that are 46 and 47% identical to sequences in the NH(2)-terminal region of the budding yeast Bub1 protein kinase. Bub1p is known to bind Bub3p(More)
The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is the major surveillance system that ensures that sister chromatids do not separate until all chromosomes are correctly bioriented during mitosis. Components of the checkpoint include Mad1, Mad2, Mad3 (BubR1), Bub3, and the kinases Bub1, Mph1 (Mps1), and Aurora B. Checkpoint proteins are recruited to kinetochores when(More)
The spindle checkpoint is the prime cell-cycle control mechanism that ensures sister chromatids are bioriented before anaphase takes place. Aurora B kinase, the catalytic subunit of the chromosome passenger complex, both destabilizes kinetochore attachments that do not generate tension and simultaneously maintains the spindle checkpoint signal. However, it(More)
The spindle checkpoint delays anaphase onset until all chromosomes are correctly attached to microtubules. Ipl1 protein kinase (Aurora B) is required to correct inappropriate kinetochore-microtubule attachments and for the response to lack of tension between sister kinetochores. Here we identify residues in the checkpoint protein Mad3p that are(More)
Resident proteins of the ER lumen carry a specific tetrapeptide signal (KDEL or HDEL) that prevents their secretion. We have previously described the isolation of yeast mutants that fail to retain such resident proteins within the cell. Here we describe ERD2, a gene required for retention. It encodes a 26 kd integral membrane protein whose abundance(More)