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The spindle checkpoint regulates the cell division cycle by keeping cells with defective spindles from leaving mitosis. In the two-hybrid system, three proteins that are components of the checkpoint, Mad1, Mad2, and Mad3, were shown to interact with Cdc20, a protein required for exit from mitosis. Mad2 and Mad3 coprecipitated with Cdc20 at all stages of the(More)
Every mitosis, replicated chromosomes must be accurately segregated into each daughter cell. Pairs of sister chromatids attach to the bipolar mitotic spindle during prometaphase, they are aligned at metaphase, then sisters separate and are pulled to opposite poles during anaphase. Failure to attach correctly to the spindle before anaphase onset results in(More)
In animal cells, luminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins are prevented from being secreted by a sorting system that recognizes the C-terminal sequence KDEL. We show that yeast has a similar sorting system, but it recognizes HDEL, rather than KDEL: derivatives of the enzyme invertase that bear the HDEL signal fail to be secreted. An invertase fusion(More)
Chromosome segregation is a complex and astonishingly accurate process whose inner working is beginning to be understood at the molecular level. The spindle checkpoint plays a key role in ensuring the fidelity of this process. It monitors the interactions between chromosomes and microtubules, and delays mitotic progression to allow extra time to correct(More)
The spindle assembly checkpoint keeps cells with defective spindles from initiating chromosome segregation. The protein kinase Mps1 phosphorylates the yeast protein Mad1p when this checkpoint is activated, and the overexpression of Mps1p induces modification of Mad1p and arrests wild-type yeast cells in mitosis with morphologically normal spindles. Spindle(More)
The spindle checkpoint arrests the cell cycle at metaphase in the presence of defects in the mitotic spindle or in the attachment of chromosomes to the spindle. When spindle assembly is disrupted, the budding yeast mad and bub mutants fail to arrest and rapidly lose viability. We have cloned the MAD2 gene, which encodes a protein of 196 amino acids that(More)
The spindle checkpoint ensures proper chromosome segregation by delaying anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. We investigated the role of the fission yeast bub1 gene in spindle checkpoint function and in unperturbed mitoses. We find that bub1(+) is essential for the fission yeast spindle checkpoint response to(More)
The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is the major surveillance system that ensures that sister chromatids do not separate until all chromosomes are correctly bioriented during mitosis. Components of the checkpoint include Mad1, Mad2, Mad3 (BubR1), Bub3, and the kinases Bub1, Mph1 (Mps1), and Aurora B. Checkpoint proteins are recruited to kinetochores when(More)
The spindle checkpoint plays a central role in the fidelity of chromosome transmission by ensuring that anaphase is initiated only after kinetochore-microtubule associations of all sister chromatid pairs are complete. In this study, we find that known spindle checkpoint proteins do not contribute equally to chromosome segregation fidelity in Saccharomyces(More)
The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents cells from initiating anaphase until the spindle has been fully assembled. We previously isolated mitotic arrest deficient (mad) mutants that inactivate this checkpoint and thus increase the sensitivity of cells to benomyl, a drug that interferes with mitotic spindle assembly by depolymerizing microtubules. We have(More)