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The amyloid peptides Aβ(40) and Aβ(42) of Alzheimer's disease are thought to contribute differentially to the disease process. Although Aβ(42) seems more pathogenic than Aβ(40), the reason for this is not well understood. We show here that small alterations in the Aβ(42):Aβ(40) ratio dramatically affect the biophysical and biological properties of the Aβ(More)
The mechanisms by which mutations in the presenilins (PSEN) or the amyloid precursor protein (APP) genes cause familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) are controversial. FAD mutations increase the release of amyloid β (Aβ)42 relative to Aβ40 by an unknown, possibly gain-of-toxic-function, mechanism. However, many PSEN mutations paradoxically impair γ-secretase and(More)
Since the reformulation of the amyloid cascade hypothesis to focus on oligomeric aggregates of amyloid beta as the prime toxic species causing Alzheimer's disease, many researchers refocused on detecting a specific molecular assembly of defined size thatis the main trigger of Alzheimer's disease. The result has been the identification of a host of molecular(More)
Syntaxin and Munc18 are, in tandem, essential for exocytosis in all eukaryotes. Recently, it was shown that Munc18 inhibition of neuronal syntaxin 1 can be overcome by arachidonic acid, indicating that this common second messenger acts to disrupt the syntaxin-Munc18 interaction. Here, we show that arachidonic acid can stimulate syntaxin 1 alone, indicating(More)
BACE1 cleaves the amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the β-cleavage site (Met(671) -Asp(672) ) to initiate the generation of amyloid peptide Aβ. BACE1 is also known to cleave APP at a much less well-characterized β'-cleavage site (Tyr(681) -Glu(682) ). We describe here the identification of a novel APP mutation E682K located at this β'-site in an early(More)
The aggregation and deposition of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain has been linked with neuronal death, which progresses in the diagnostic and pathological signs of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The transition of an unstructured monomeric peptide into self-assembled and more structured aggregates is the crucial conversion from what appears to be a(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder that involves a plethora of molecular pathways. In the context of therapeutic treatment and biomarker profiling, the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide constitutes an interesting research avenue that involves interactions within a complex mixture of Aβ alloforms and other disease-modifying(More)
Most Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cases are late-onset and characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide in extracellular plaques in the brain. However, a few rare and hereditary Aβ mutations, such as the Italian Glu22-to-Lys (E22K) mutation, guarantee the development of early-onset familial AD. This type of AD is associated(More)
  • Jesper Lansink Rotgerink, Prof Dr Stephan, A Van Gils, Zagaris Dr Antonios, Kerensa Broersen
  • 2013
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most well known form of dementia. Already in 1907 Alois Alzheimer published a first paper about the symptoms of this disease, of which we know that it afflicts one in three people above 85. By now it is broadly accepted that indeed the loss of short-term memory is among the first symptoms of AD, followed by behavioural(More)
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