Kenta Matsuda

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The antagonistic interaction with host restriction proteins is a major driver of evolutionary change for viruses. We previously reported that polymorphisms of the TRIM5α B30.2/SPRY domain impacted the level of SIVsmm viremia in rhesus macaques. Viremia in macaques homozygous for the non-restrictive TRIM5α allele TRIM5(Q) was significantly higher than in(More)
Primate lentiviruses including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) evolved through the acquisition of antagonists against intrinsic host restriction factors, such as tetherin. It is widely accepted that HIV-1 has emerged by zoonotic transmission of SIV in chimpanzee (SIVcpz), and that SIVcpz Nef protein(More)
Prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV remains a major objective where antenatal care is not readily accessible. We tested anti-HIV-1 human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NmAb) as post-exposure therapy in an infant macaque model for intrapartum MTCT. One-month-old rhesus macaques were inoculated orally with SHIV SF162P3. On days 1, 4,(More)
Human immunodeficiency virus, a primate lentivirus (PLV), causes AIDS in humans, whereas most PLVs are less or not pathogenic in monkeys. These notions suggest that the co-evolutionary process of PLVs and their hosts associates with viral pathogenicity, and therefore, that elucidating the history of virus-host co-evolution is one of the most intriguing(More)
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