Kenny R. Coventry

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AIMS To examine changes in physiological arousal, as indexed by heart rate, during fruit machine gambling while controlling for the confounding effect of movement and as a function of winning and losing, and to examine relationships between sensation-seeking, self-reported arousal during gambling, heart rate during gambling and frequency of gambling.(More)
Heart rate was recorded in a sample of 32 off-course horse racing bettors before, during and after the gambling process, together with sensation seeking and information regarding frequency and expenditure on gambling. Importantly, the present study controlled for the confounding effects of movement on heart rate present in previous studies. Significant(More)
AIMS To examine gender differences in changes in physiological arousal as indexed by heart rate during fruit machine gambling while controlling for the confounding effect of movement and as a function of winning and losing, and to examine relationships between sensation-seeking, self-reported arousal during gambling, heart rate during gambling and loss of(More)
The importance of a mirror neuron system (MNS) as a mechanism for understanding the actions of others has been established (e.g., Rizzolatti, Fadiga, Gallese, & Fogassi, 1996). Neurons in the primate premotor cortex fire both when a monkey performs an action (e.g., grasping) and when the monkey observes someone else performing the same action. It has also(More)
Mobile telephones were used to collect data on the relationship between gambling and mood state from gamblers in the field. Seventeen gamblers called an interactive voice response system running on a computer before, during and after a gambling episode. Measures taken in this way included self-reports of anxiety/arousal, the amount of money gambled, whether(More)
There is much empirical evidence showing that factors other than the relative positions of objects in Euclidean space are important in the comprehension of a wide range of spatial prepositions in English and other languages. We first the overview the functional geometric framework (Coventry & Garrod, 2004) which puts “what” and “where” information together(More)
The literature on vague quantifiers in English (words like “some”, “many”, etc.) is replete with demonstrations of context effects. Yet little attention has been paid to the issue of where such effects come from. We explore the possibility that such they emanate from a visual attentional bottleneck which limits the accuracy of judgments of number in visual(More)
In the past decade, many studies have focused on the relationship between emotional valence and vertical spatial positions from a processing perspective. Lakoff and Johnson's (1980) work on conceptual metaphor has traditionally motivated these investigations, but recent work (Lakens in J Exp Psychol: Learn, Mem Cogn, 38: 726-736, 2012) has suggested that(More)
Spatial demonstratives (this/that) play a crucial role when indicating object locations using language. However, the relationship between the use of these proximal and distal linguistic descriptors and the near (peri-personal) versus far (extra-personal) perceptual space distinction is a source of controversy [Kemmerer, D. (1999). "Near" and "far" in(More)