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Recurrent chromosomal rearrangements have not been well characterized in common carcinomas. We used a bioinformatics approach to discover candidate oncogenic chromosomal aberrations on the basis of outlier gene expression. Two ETS transcription factors, ERG and ETV1, were identified as outliers in prostate cancer. We identified recurrent gene fusions of the(More)
Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in American men. Screening for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has led to earlier detection of prostate cancer, but elevated serum PSA levels may be present in non-malignant conditions such as benign prostatic hyperlasia (BPH). Characterization of gene-expression profiles that molecularly distinguish(More)
Despite efforts to profile prostate cancer, the genetic alterations and biological processes that correlate with the observed histological progression are unclear. Using laser-capture microdissection to isolate 101 cell populations, we have profiled prostate cancer progression from benign epithelium to metastatic disease. By analyzing expression signatures(More)
Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that plays a key role in prostate cancer. Little is known about the nature of AR cis-regulatory sites in the human genome. We have mapped the AR binding regions on two chromosomes in human prostate cancer cells by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with tiled oligonucleotide(More)
Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in males and is second only to lung cancer. Although effective surgical and radiation treatments exist for clinically localized prostate cancer, metastatic prostate cancer remains essentially incurable. Here we show, through gene expression profiling, that the polycomb group protein enhancer of(More)
Characterization of the prostate cancer transcriptome and genome has identified chromosomal rearrangements and copy number gains and losses, including ETS gene family fusions, PTEN loss and androgen receptor (AR) amplification, which drive prostate cancer development and progression to lethal, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However,(More)
Recently, we identified recurrent gene fusions involving the 5' untranslated region of the androgen-regulated gene TMPRSS2 and the ETS (E26 transformation-specific) family genes ERG, ETV1 or ETV4 in most prostate cancers. Whereas TMPRSS2-ERG fusions are predominant, fewer TMPRSS2-ETV1 cases have been identified than expected on the basis of the frequency of(More)
Neoplasms have a striking tendency to metastasize or " home " to bone. Hematopoietic cells also home to bone during embryonic development, where evidence points to the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 or CXCL12; expressed by osteoblasts and endothelial cells) and its receptor (CXCR4) as key elements in these processes. We hypothesized that(More)
Prostate cancers remain indolent in the majority of individuals but behave aggressively in a minority. The molecular basis for this clinical heterogeneity remains incompletely understood. Here we characterize a long noncoding RNA termed SChLAP1 (second chromosome locus associated with prostate-1; also called LINC00913) that is overexpressed in a subset of(More)
Cancer can be viewed as the loss of cooperative cell behaviors that normally facilitate multicellularity, including the formation of tissues and organs. Hanahan and Weinberg describe the phenotypic differences between healthy and cancerous cells in an article titled "The Hallmarks of Cancer" (Cell, 100, 57-70, 2000). Here the authors propose six phenotypic(More)