Kenneth Hughes

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STUDY OBJECTIVE The aim of the study was to analyse differences in mortality from the main cardiovascular diseases (ischaemic heart disease, hypertensive disease, and cerebrovascular disease) among Chinese, Malays, and Indians in Singapore. DESIGN The study was a survey using national death registration data in Singapore for the five years 1980 to 1984.(More)
STUDY OBJECTIVE To examine the hypothesis that the higher rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Indians (South Asians) compared with Malays and Chinese is at least partly explained by central obesity, insulin resistance, and syndrome X (including possible components). DESIGN Cross sectional study of the general population. SETTING Singapore. (More)
STUDY OBJECTIVE The aim of the study was to examine cardiovascular risk factors to see how these might explain differences in cardiovascular disease mortality among Chinese, Malays, and Indians in the Republic of Singapore. DESIGN The study was a population based cross sectional survey. Stratified systematic sampling of census districts, reticulated(More)
OBJECTIVE To examine the hypothesis that the higher rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Indians (South Asians) compared with Malays and Chinese is partly attributable to differences in blood concentrations of homocysteine, and related blood concentrations of folate and vitamin B12. DESIGN Cross sectional study of the general population. SETTING(More)
Cardiovascular risk factors were compared between 126 people with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and 530 non-diabetics (controls), in a random sample of people (Chinese, Malays, and Asian Indians) aged 40-69 years from the general population of Singapore. Data were adjusted for age and ethnicity. For both genders, people with NIDDM had(More)
OBJECTIVE Asian Indian men are reported to have a higher incidence of coronary heart disease than men of other ethnic groups worldwide. Among the many hypotheses, one possible risk factor may be related to their dietary habits. This study estimated the plasma concentrations of fatty acids, antioxidant vitamins, and selenium in Indians and Chinese of(More)
Mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Singapore has been studied from vital statistics for the 25 years from 1959 to 1983. The age-standardized rates for ages 30 to 69 years increased in men from 106.8 per 100 000 in 1959-1963 to 204.5 in 1979-1983, while for women they increased from 30.7 to 72.0 per 100 000. The male to female ratios in the(More)
To investigate how cigarette smoking increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, risk factors were compared between 166 cigarette smokers and 312 non-smokers, in a random sample of males (Chinese, Malays and Asian Indians) aged 30-69 years from the general population of Singapore. There was adjusted for age and ethnic group. The prevalence of hypertension(More)
Recent epidemiologic data suggests that Rickettsia australis, the cause of Queensland tick typhus, is present in southeastern Australia. In order to further confirm this observation, a canine serosurvey was undertaken to determine if naturally occurring antibodies were present in pet and farm dogs from this newly-recognized endemic area. Thirty-five of 312(More)
STUDY OBJECTIVE To examine the hypothesis that the higher rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Indians (South Asians) compared with Malays and Chinese is partly because of differences in antioxidants (vitamins A, C, and E, and selenium) and pro-oxidants (iron). DESIGN Cross sectional study of the general population. SETTING Singapore. PARTICIPANTS(More)