Ken-ichiro Fukuchi

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Deposits of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) in neuritic plaques and cerebral vessels are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Fibrillar Abeta deposits are closely associated with inflammatory responses such as activated microglia in brain with this disease. Increasing lines of evidence support the hypothesis that activated microglia, innate immune(More)
Amyloid plaques, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), are accompanied by activated microglia. The role of activated microglia in the pathogenesis of AD remains controversial: either clearing Aβ deposits by phagocytosis or releasing proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic substances. Microglia can be activated via toll-like receptors (TLRs),(More)
OBJECTIVE Normal aging is often associated with a decline in learning and memory functions. This decline is manifested to a much greater extent in Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies have indicated statins, a class of cholesterol-lowering drugs, as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Our objective was to determine whether administering a statin(More)
High fat/high cholesterol diets exacerbate beta-amyloidosis in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been impossible, however, to study the relationship between atherosclerosis and beta-amyloidosis in those models because such mice were on atherosclerosis-resistant genetic backgrounds. Here we report the establishment of AD model mice, B6Tg2576,(More)
Aβ deposits in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are closely associated with innate immune responses such as activated microglia and increased cytokines. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that innate immune/inflammatory responses play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD: either beneficial or harmful effects on the AD(More)
The accumulation of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) in the brain is thought to be a primary etiologic event in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Fibrillar Aβ plaques, a hallmark of AD abnormality, are closely associated with activated microglia. Activated microglia have contradictory roles in the pathogenesis of AD, being either neuroprotective (by clearing harmful Aβ and(More)
Emerging evidence indicates that cholesterol metabolism affects the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The LDL receptor (LDLR) is obligatory in maintaining cholesterol homeostasis in the periphery. To investigate the role of LDLR in the development of AD-like behavior and pathology, Tg2576 mice, a well-characterized transgenic mouse model of AD, with(More)
All tissues contain the enzymes that modify and remove O-GlcNAc dynamically from nucleocytoplasmic proteins. These enzymes have been shown to play a role in the control of transcription, vesicular trafficking and, more recently, proteasome function. Modification by O-GlcNAc of the 19S cap of the proteasome inhibits proteasomal function. Transcripts of both(More)
Accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) in the brain is thought to be a causal event in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Immunotherapy targeting Aβ holds great promise for reducing Aβ in the brain. Here, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of anti-Aβ single-chain antibody (scFv59) delivery via recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) on reducing Aβ deposits in an(More)
Induction of an immune response to amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) is effective in treating animal models of Alzheimer's disease. Human clinical trials of vaccination with synthetic Abeta (AN1792), however, were halted due to brain inflammation, presumably induced by T cell-mediated immune responses. We have developed an adenovirus vector as a "possibly safer"(More)