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  • Ken Garber
  • Journal of the National Cancer Institute
  • 2006
Oncolytic virus research got a welcome boost last November when Chinese regulators approved the world’s fi rst oncolytic viral therapy for cancer, Shanghai Sunway Biotech’s genetically modifi ed adenovirus H101. “ It’s fantastic for the fi eld, ” said John Bell , Ph.D., of the Ottawa Health Research Institute in Canada. “ We needed to have something that(More)
  • Ken Garber
  • Journal of the National Cancer Institute
  • 2009
resistance to gemcitabine, the standard therapy for pancreatic cancer, and sensitivity to mitomycin C, a rarely used treatment. The patient — who fi rst failed gemcitabine therapy — received mitomycin C and has been in remission for more than 2 years. The trial’s principal investigator, Manuel Hidalgo , M.D., Ph.D., stressed that tumorgrafts, at present,(More)
The first clinical trial of a drug’s ability to forestall Alzheimer’s disease in cognitively healthy individuals is preparing to launch. Genentech of S. San Francisco, California, the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix, Arizona, and the US National Institutes of Health will together spend $96 million in an international effort testing Genentech’s(More)
VOLUME 33 NUMBER 9 SEPTEMBER 2015 NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY autologous transplants, which would have been much more informative. “There’s only been one patient with the autologous, which is a shame,” says Pete Coffey, a stem cell researcher at University College London. “An N of one is never good, that’s for sure.” For RIKEN’s future allogeneic trial, cells will(More)
  • Ken Garber
  • Journal of the National Cancer Institute
  • 2011
T he March 25 approval of ipilimumab (Yervoy) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration was a milestone for the embattled field of cancer immuno-therapy. As the first agent to increase overall survival in a phase III melanoma trial, ipilimumab appeared to vindicate the immune surveillance hypothesis of cancer first proposed in 1957. That hypothesis, which(More)