Keith R Bradnam

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MOTIVATION The numbers of finished and ongoing genome projects are increasing at a rapid rate, and providing the catalog of genes for these new genomes is a key challenge. Obtaining a set of well-characterized genes is a basic requirement in the initial steps of any genome annotation process. An accurate set of genes is needed in order to learn about(More)
Genome sequencing projects have been initiated for a wide range of eukaryotes. A few projects have reached completion, but most exist as draft assemblies. As one of the main reasons to sequence a genome is to obtain its catalog of genes, an important question is how complete or completable the catalog is in unfinished genomes. To answer this question, we(More)
WormBase (http://www.wormbase.org), the model organism database for information about Caenorhabditis elegans and related nematodes, continues to expand in breadth and depth. Over the past year, WormBase has added multiple large-scale datasets including SAGE, interactome, 3D protein structure datasets and NCBI KOGs. To accommodate this growth, the(More)
Low-cost short read sequencing technology has revolutionized genomics, though it is only just becoming practical for the high-quality de novo assembly of a novel large genome. We describe the Assemblathon 1 competition, which aimed to comprehensively assess the state of the art in de novo assembly methods when applied to current sequencing technologies. In(More)
BACKGROUND The process of generating raw genome sequence data continues to become cheaper, faster, and more accurate. However, assembly of such data into high-quality, finished genome sequences remains challenging. Many genome assembly tools are available, but they differ greatly in terms of their performance (speed, scalability, hardware requirements,(More)
WormBase (http://www.wormbase.org/) is a web-accessible central data repository for information about Caenorhabditis elegans and related nematodes. The past two years have seen a significant expansion in the biological scope of WormBase, including the integration of large-scale, genome-wide data sets, the inclusion of genome sequence and gene predictions(More)
Centromeres are essential for chromosome segregation, yet their DNA sequences evolve rapidly. In most animals and plants that have been studied, centromeres contain megabase-scale arrays of tandem repeats. Despite their importance, very little is known about the degree to which centromere tandem repeats share common properties between different species(More)
While many properties of eukaryotic gene structure are well characterized, differences in the form and function of introns that occur at different positions within a transcript are less well understood. In particular, the dynamics of intron length variation with respect to intron position has received relatively little attention. This study analyzes all(More)
WormBase (http://www.wormbase.org/) is the central data repository for information about Caenorhabditis elegans and related nematodes. As a model organism database, WormBase extends beyond the genomic sequence, integrating experimental results with extensively annotated views of the genome. The WormBase Consortium continues to expand the biological scope(More)
Introns in a wide range of organisms including plants, animals and fungi are able to increase the expression of the gene that they are contained in. This process of intron-mediated enhancement (IME) is most thoroughly studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, where it has been shown that enhancing introns are typically located near the promoter and are(More)