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Categorical Speech Representation in Human Superior Temporal Gyrus
TLDR
This work found that listening to synthesized speech stimuli varying in small and acoustically equal steps evoked distinct and invariant cortical population response patterns that were organized by their sensitivities to critical acoustic features.
Phonetic Feature Encoding in Human Superior Temporal Gyrus
TLDR
High-density direct cortical surface recordings in humans while they listened to natural, continuous speech were used to reveal the STG representation of the entire English phonetic inventory, demonstrating the acoustic-phonetic representation of speech in human STG.
Functional Organization of Human Sensorimotor Cortex for Speech Articulation
TLDR
High-resolution, multi-electrode cortical recordings during the production of consonant-vowel syllables reveal the dynamic organization of speech sensorimotor cortex during the generation of multi-articulator movements that underlies the ability to speak.
Speaker Normalization in Speech Perception
Talkers differ from each other in a great many ways. Some of the difference is in the choice of linguistic variants for particular words, as immortalized in the song by George and Ira Gershwin “Let’s
The auditory representation of speech sounds in human motor cortex
TLDR
Motor cortex does not contain articulatory representations of perceived actions in speech, but rather, represents auditory vocal information, which has been controversially interpreted as evidence that speech sounds are processed as articulatory gestures.
Auditory–visual integration of talker gender in vowel perception
The experiments reported here used auditory–visual mismatches to compare three approaches to speaker normalization in speech perception: radical invariance, vocal tract normalization, and talker
Gradient and Visual Speaker Normalization in the Perception of Fricatives
TLDR
Listeners’ responses to prototypical and non—prototypical male and female speech with their responses to audio—visual integrated stimuli in the fricatives [sj (“sod”) and [I] in Ohio English suggest that the speaker’s sex affects perception of fricative in a “gradient” manner.
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