Keith Cassell

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Large, unwieldy classes are a significant maintenance problem. Programmers dislike them because the fundamental logic is often obscured, making them hard to understand and modify. This paper proposes a solution - a semi-automatic technique for splitting large classes into smaller, more cohesive ones. The core of the technique is the use of betweenness(More)
The usefulness of quantifying a human subject's tracking performance by means of a temporal correlation technique has been investigated using a pursuit tracking device. Three tracking tasks of varying degrees of difficulty were employed in order to test the technique over a range of performances. A crosspower spectral-density analysis of the results has(More)
Techniques by which the quantitative anatomical data inherent in a CT scan can be directly used in treatment planning are described. The correction algorithms used in the RAD-8 system, based on an effective path length, have been extended to a pixel-by-pixel approach. By calibrating the X-ray transmission CT scanner in terms of electron densities (electron(More)
A method, developed from the Quantisation Method, of calculating dose-rate distributions around uniformly and nonuniformly loaded brachytherapy sources is described. It allows accurate and straightforward corrections for oblique filtration and self-absorption to be made. Using this method, dose-rate distributions have been calculated for sources of radium(More)
A method for performing inhomogeneity corrections using a generalised Batho equation is described. The corrections are performed using the quantitative anatomical data produced by a CT scanner. The generalised Batho equation has been implemented on an EMIPLAN 7000 interactive treatment planning system. Details are given of the acquisition of the required(More)
When developing object-oriented classes, it is difficult to determine how to best reallocate the members of large, complex classes to create smaller, more cohesive ones. Clustering techniques can provide guidance on how to solve this allocation problem; however, inappropriate use of clustering can result in a class structure that is less maintainable than(More)
When developing object-oriented classes, it is difficult to determine how to best reallocate the members of large, complex classes to create smaller, more cohesive ones. Clustering techniques can provide guidance on how to solve this allocation problem; however, inappropriate use of clustering can result in a class structure that is less maintainable than(More)