Keith A. Tarvin

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Why females mate with multiple males, particularly in socially monogamous species, is one of the central unanswered questions in sexual selection and behavioural ecology. Recent theory suggests that socially monogamous females may improve the genetic quality of their offspring by mating with extrapair males with whom they are more genetically dissimilar(More)
Michael S. Webster, Keith A. Tarvin, Elaina M. Tuttle, and Stephen Pruett-Jones School of Biological Sciences and Center for Reproductive Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4236, USA, Department of Biology, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH 44074, USA, Department of Life Sciences, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, USA, and(More)
Interest in female ornamentation has burgeoned recently, and evidence suggests that carotenoid-based female coloration may function as a mate-choice signal. However, the possibility that females may signal status with coloration has been all but ignored. Bill coloration of female American goldfinches (Spinus tristis) changes seasonally, from dull gray in(More)
Sexual signaling systems often explain conspicuous male ornaments (Andersson 1994; Johnstone 1997). In sexual signaling systems, female receivers may use information extracted from male signals as the basis for choosing mates. Females can overcome deceptive male interests by preferring signal characters that impose costs to the signaling male (Zahavi 1975;(More)
Many socially monogamous species paradoxically show signs of strong sexual selection, suggesting cryptic sources of sexual competition among males. Darwin argued that sexual selection could operate in monogamous systems if breeding sex ratios are biased or if some males attract highly fecund females. Alternatively, sexual selection might result from(More)
M. F. Rosenthal and K. A. Tarvin (keith.tarvin@oberlin.edu), Dept of Biology, Oberlin College, OH 44074, USA. Present address of MFR: School of Biological Sciences, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-0118, USA. – T. G. Murphy, Dept of Biology, Queen’s Univ., Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada. Present address of TGM: Dept of Biology, Trinity Univ., San Antonio,(More)
Males of certain species of fairy-wrens (Aves: Maluridae) emit a unique vocalization, the Type II vocalization, in response to the calls of potential predators. We conducted ®eld observations and playback experiments to identify the contexts in which the Type II vocalization is emitted by splendid fairy-wren (Malurus splendens) males, and to examine social(More)
The white-winged fairy-wren (Malurus leucopterus) exhibits striking plumage colour variation between the Australian mainland and two islands (Dirk Hartog Island and Barrow Island) off the coast of Western Australia. Adult males on the mainland are bright blue with white wings and adult males on the two islands are black with white wings. To examine(More)
Conspicuous ornamentation has been linked to immunological and physiological condition in males of many species. In species where both sexes are ornamented, it is unclear whether the signal content of ornaments differs between males and females. We examined the immunological and physiological correlates of carotenoid-based bill and plumage ornamentation in(More)
Conspicuous ornamentation has been linked to immunological and physiological condition in males of many species. In species where both sexes are ornamented, it is unclear whether the signal content of ornaments differs between males and females. We examined the immunological and physiological correlates of carotenoid-based bill and plumage ornamentation in(More)