Learn More
The reason why vulnerabilities to mutant polyglutamine (polyQ) proteins are different among neuronal subtypes is mostly unknown. In this study, we compared the gene expression profiles of three types of primary neurons expressing huntingtin (htt) or ataxin-1. We found that heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), a well known chaperone molecule protecting neurons in(More)
Oct-3/4 (Oct-3/Oct-4/POU5F1) is a critical regulator of embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation, though its role in tissue stem cells that persist in differentiated tissues has not been shown. Here, we show that Oct-3/4 is expressed in neurospheres (NS) composed of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells and that up- or down-regulation of Oct-3/4 by(More)
DNA repair defends against naturally occurring or disease-associated DNA damage during the long lifespan of neurons and is implicated in polyglutamine disease pathology. In this study, we report that mutant huntingtin (Htt) expression in neurons causes double-strand breaks (DSBs) of genomic DNA, and Htt further promotes DSBs by impairing DNA repair. We(More)
Transcriptional disturbance is implicated in the pathology of polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD). However, it is unknown whether transcriptional repression leads to neuronal death or what forms that death might take. We found transcriptional repression-induced atypical death (TRIAD) of neurons to be distinct from apoptosis,(More)
It is hypothesized that a common underlying mechanism links multiple neurodegenerative disorders. Here we show that transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (TERA)/valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 directly binds to multiple polyglutamine disease proteins (huntingtin, ataxin-1, ataxin-7 and androgen receptor) via polyglutamine sequence. Although normal(More)
Aggregation of disease proteins is believed to be a central event in the pathology of polyglutamine diseases, whereas the relationship between aggregation and neuronal death remains controversial. We investigated this question by expressing mutant huntingtin (htt) with a defective adenovirus in different types of neurons prepared from rat cerebral cortex,(More)
Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a nuclear protein homologous to the high-mobility group B1 family of proteins. It is known to be released from cells and to act as a trophic factor for dividing cells. In this study HDGF was increased in spinal motor neurons of a mouse model of motor neuron degeneration, polyglutamine-tract-binding protein-1 (PQBP-1)(More)
Mutations in the dysferlin gene cause muscular dystrophies called dysferlinopathy, which include limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) and Miyoshi myopathy (MM). To clarify the frequency, clinicopathological and genetic features of dysferlinopathy in Japan, we performed protein and gene analyses of dysferlin. We examined a total of 107 unrelated(More)
Neuronal cell death in neurodegenerative diseases is not fully understood. Here we report that mutant huntingtin (Htt), a causative gene product of Huntington’s diseases (HD) selectively induces a new form of necrotic cell death, in which endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enlarges and cell body asymmetrically balloons and finally ruptures. Pharmacological and(More)