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Cohesin complexes mediate sister-chromatid cohesion in dividing cells but may also contribute to gene regulation in postmitotic cells. How cohesin regulates gene expression is not known. Here we describe cohesin-binding sites in the human genome and show that most of these are associated with the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), a zinc-finger protein required(More)
Sister chromatid cohesion, which is mediated by the cohesin complex, is vital for faithful segregation of chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis (reviewed in). Cohesion is established during S phase, and this process requires the function of the acetyltransferase Eco1/Ctf7. The mechanism of the cohesion establishment is, however, still unclear. Here, we(More)
Sister chromatids, the products of eukaryotic DNA replication, are held together by the chromosomal cohesin complex after their synthesis. This allows the spindle in mitosis to recognize pairs of replication products for segregation into opposite directions. Cohesin forms large protein rings that may bind DNA strands by encircling them, but the(More)
BACKGROUND Cells undergoing meiosis perform two consecutive divisions after a single round of DNA replication. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes segregate to opposite poles. This is achieved by (1) the pairing of maternal and paternal chromosomes via recombination producing chiasmata, (2) coorientation of homologous chromosomes such(More)
The checkpoint regulatory mechanism has an important role in maintaining the integrity of the genome. This is particularly important in S phase of the cell cycle, when genomic DNA is most susceptible to various environmental hazards. When chemical agents damage DNA, activation of checkpoint signalling pathways results in a temporary cessation of DNA(More)
Segregation of homologous maternal and paternal centromeres to opposite poles during meiosis I depends on post-replicative crossing over between homologous non-sister chromatids, which creates chiasmata and therefore bivalent chromosomes. Destruction of sister chromatid cohesion along chromosome arms due to proteolytic cleavage of cohesin's Rec8 subunit by(More)
Sister chromatid cohesion is essential for chromosome segregation and is mediated by cohesin bound to DNA. Cohesin-DNA interactions can be reversed by the cohesion-associated protein Wapl, whereas a stably DNA-bound form of cohesin is thought to mediate cohesion. In vertebrates, Sororin is essential for cohesion and stable cohesin-DNA interactions, but how(More)
BACKGROUND Chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotes initiates from multiple origins of replication, and because of this multiplicity, activation of replication origins is likely to be highly coordinated; origins fire at characteristic times, with some origins firing on average earlier (early-firing origins) and others later (late-firing origins) in the S(More)
Cohesin is a multisubunit complex that mediates sister-chromatid cohesion. Its Smc1 and Smc3 subunits possess ABC-like ATPases at one end of 50 nm long coiled coils. At the other ends are pseudosymmetrical hinge domains that interact to create V-shaped Smc1/Smc3 heterodimers. N- and C-terminal domains within cohesin's kleisin subunit Scc1 bind to Smc3 and(More)
In meiosis, a single round of DNA replication is followed by two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation, called meiosis I and II. Disjunction of maternal from paternal centromeres during meiosis I depends on the attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules emanating from the same pole. In budding yeast, monopolar attachment requires recruitment(More)