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— The problem of automatically matching composite sketches to facial photographs is addressed in this paper. Previous research on sketch recognition focused on matching sketches drawn by professional artists who either looked directly at the subjects (viewed sketches) or used a verbal description of the subject's appearance as provided by an eyewitness(More)
—This paper presents a framework for component-based face alignment and representation that demonstrates improvements in matching performance over the more common holistic approach to face alignment and representation. This work is motivated by recent evidence from the cognitive science community demonstrating the efficacy of component-based facial(More)
We introduce a novel framework for estimating visual sensitivity using a continuous target-tracking task in concert with a dynamic internal model of human visual performance. Observers used a mouse cursor to track the center of a two-dimensional Gaussian luminance blob as it moved in a random walk in a field of dynamic additive Gaussian luminance noise. To(More)
Some animals with lateral eyes (such as bees) control their navigation through the 3D world using velocity differences between the two eyes. Other animals with frontal eyes (such as primates, including humans) can perceive 3D motion based on the different velocities that a moving object projects upon the two retinae. Although one type of 3D motion(More)
We introduce a novel framework for estimating visual sensitivity using a continuous target-tracking task in concert with a dynamic internal model of human visual performance. In our main experiment, observers used a mouse cursor to track the center of a 2D Gaussian luminance target as it moved in a Brownian walk in a field of dynamic Gaussian luminance(More)
When an object moves directly towards or away from an observer, it projects opposite horizontal directions of motion upon the two retinae. Binocular 3D motion perception relies on this cue, the inter-ocular velocity difference (IOVD). However, many animals have little or no binocular overlap, but are known to depend upon inter-ocular velocity comparisons(More)
The threshold for detecting stereoscopic motion is notably higher than that for detecting the equivalent fronto-parallel motion. Thus, for small excursions, an apparently stationary line can easily be seen as moving by simply closing one eye - two eyes being less sensitive than one (Tyler, 1971). Here, we used a 3D tracking paradigm to examine motion(More)
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