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OBJECTIVE To examine patterns of variability in social visual engagement and their relationship to standardized measures of social disability in a heterogeneous sample of school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). METHOD Eye-tracking measures of visual fixation during free-viewing of dynamic social scenes were obtained for 109 children(More)
Power laws have been widely used to formulate relationships between objective intensity of stimulation and subjective intensity of sensation. We investigated the effects of dopaminergic drug treatment (sulpiride) on the relationship between somatosensory stimulus intensity and cortical response measured electrophysiologically by somatosensory-evoked(More)
We investigated the role of the amygdala in mental state inference in a sample of adults and in a sample of children aged 4 and 6 years. This period in early childhood represents a time when mentalizing abilities undergo dramatic changes. Both children and adults inferred mental states from pictures of others' eyes, and children also inferred the mental(More)
Theory of mind (ToM)--or thinking about the mental states of others--is a cornerstone of successful everyday social interaction. However, the brain bases of ToM are most frequently measured via explicit laboratory tasks that pose direct questions about mental states (e.g. "In this story, what does Steve think Julia believes?"). Neuroanatomical measures may(More)
Episodic memory shows striking improvement during early childhood. However, neural contributions to these behavioral changes are not well understood. This study examined associations between episodic memory and volume of subregions (head, body, and tail) of the hippocampus-a structure known to support episodic memory in school-aged children and(More)
Although children's social development is embedded in social interaction, most developmental neuroscience studies have examined responses to non-interactive social stimuli (e.g. photographs of faces). The neural mechanisms of real-world social behavior are of special interest during middle childhood (roughly ages 7-13), a time of increased social complexity(More)
Mounting evidence suggests that social interaction changes how communicative behaviors (e.g., spoken language, gaze) are processed, but the precise neural bases by which social-interactive context may alter communication remain unknown. Various perspectives suggest that live interactions are more rewarding, more attention-grabbing, or require increased(More)
Two cornerstones of social development-social perception and theory of mind-undergo brain and behavioral changes during middle childhood, but the link between these developing domains is unclear. One theoretical perspective argues that these skills represent domain-specific areas of social development, whereas other perspectives suggest that both skills may(More)
Two cornerstones of social development--social perception and theory of mind--undergo brain and behavioral changes during middle childhood, but the link between these developing domains is unclear. One theoretical perspective argues that these skills represent domain-specific areas of social development, whereas other perspectives suggest that both skills(More)
Between ages 4 and 6, children become better at inferring what others are thinking and feeling. However, the neural correlates of these advances are understudied. The current study investigated the relation between performance on a face-based mental state inference task and white matter characteristics. Two tracts of interest, the uncinate fasciculus (UF)(More)