Katherine E. Bonnington

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Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by all Gram-negative bacteria. OMVs form when buds from the outer membrane (OM) of cells encapsulate periplasmic material and pinch off from the OM to form spheroid particles approximately 10 to 300nm in diameter. OMVs accomplish a diversity of functional roles yet the OMV's utility is ultimately(More)
BACKGROUND Understanding the pathogenic role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in disease and their potential diagnostic and therapeutic utility is extremely reliant on in-depth quantification, measurement and identification of EV sub-populations. Quantification of EVs has presented several challenges, predominantly due to the small size of vesicles such as(More)
The ability of Gram-negative bacteria to carefully modulate outer membrane (OM) composition is essential to their survival. However, the asymmetric and heterogeneous structure of the Gram-negative OM poses unique challenges to the cell's successful adaption to rapid environmental transitions. Although mechanisms to recycle and degrade OM phospholipid(More)
Gram-negative bacteria maintain the barrier properties of the outer membrane (OM) in a wide array of physiological conditions despite their inability to degrade lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and protein material present in the outer leaflet of the OM. Through characterization of the native dynamics of outer membrane LPS change we recently described a mechanism(More)
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