Learn More
OBJECTIVE Many college students overestimate both the drinking behaviors (descriptive norms) and the approval of drinking (injunctive norms) of their peers. As a result, consistent self-other discrepancies (SODs) have been observed, in which self-perceptions of drinking behaviors and approval of drinking usually are lower than comparable judgments of(More)
Peer pressure is consistently implicated in the excessive drinking of college students. However, both theory and empirical findings suggest that peer pressure is a combination of three distinct influences: overt offers of alcohol, modeling, and social norms. Overt offers of alcohol can range from polite gestures to intense goading or commands to drink.(More)
This paper describes a series of 4 studies, designed to provide evidence of the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Timeline Followback (TLFB) method when used to assess sexual risk behaviour with psychiatric outpatients. This population was selected because patients often have difficulty completing assessments of sexual risk behaviours due to(More)
After 20 years of development and research, dual diagnosis services for clients with severe mental illness are emerging as an evidence-based practice. Effective dual diagnosis programs combine mental health and substance abuse interventions that are tailored for the complex needs of clients with comorbid disorders. The authors describe the critical(More)
The reliability of self-reported sexual behavior is a question of utmost importance to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention research. The Timeline Follow-Back (TLFB) interview, which was developed to assess alcohol consumption on the event level, incorporates recall-enhancing techniques that result in reliable information. In this study, the TLFB(More)
This study examined two aspects of affect dysregulation as risk factors for alcohol-related problems. From a sample of 592 undergraduates, 442 alcohol users were examined on measures of impulsivity, lability, alcohol use, and alcohol-related problems. As expected, affect lability and impulsivity significantly increased risk for alcohol problems even after(More)
Efforts to reduce the frequency of high-risk drinking have included the use of motivational interventions. Both the technique used in motivational interventions and an underlying theory of behavior change (i.e., self-regulation theory) invoke the construct of discrepancy development. This study was designed to determine whether techniques purported to(More)
Encouraging but limited research indicates that brief motivational interventions may be an effective way to reduce heavy episodic drinking in college students. At 2 campuses, students (83% male) mandated to a substance use prevention program were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 individually administered conditions: (a) a brief motivational interview (BMI; n =(More)
This study investigated the efficacy of a 10-session, HIV-risk-reduction intervention with 221 women and 187 men receiving outpatient psychiatric care for a mental illness. Patients were randomly assigned to the HIV intervention, a structurally equivalent substance use reduction (SUR) intervention, or standard care; they were assessed pre- and(More)
Individuals diagnosed with a severe mental illness are at significantly enhanced risk for infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To better understand elevated seroprevalence in this population, we review the research literature that has investigated HIV-related risk behavior among adults who have a severe and persistent mental illness. This(More)