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The infection of CD4(+) host cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is initiated by a temporal progression of interactions between specific cell surface receptors and the viral envelope protein, gp120. These interactions produce a number of intermediate structures with distinct conformational, functional, and antigenic features that may(More)
The identification of HIV envelope structures that generate broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies is a major goal for HIV-vaccine development. In this study, we evaluated one such structure, expressed as either a gp120-CD4 or a gp140-CD4 complex, for its ability to elicit a neutralizing antibody response. In rhesus macaques, covalently crosslinked(More)
Epitopes located in and around the coreceptor binding site of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120) exhibit enhanced exposure after attachment to the CD4 receptor and comprise some of the most conserved and functionally important residues on the viral envelope. Therefore, antibody responses to these epitopes [designated as CD4-induced (CD4i)] should be highly(More)
Epitopes located in and around the coreceptor binding site of gp120 represent some of the most conserved and functionally important sequences in the HIV envelope. Many of these epitopes can be exposed prior to and/or after attachment in a manner determined by envelope sequence and infection system. Furthermore, these epitopes are immunogenic in humans and(More)
Fusion proteins containing immunoglobulin Fc domains attached to bioactive moieties have been developed as therapeutic agents against several diseases. Here, we describe the development and characteristics of a novel fusion protein (FLSC R/T-IgG1) that targets CCR5, the major coreceptor for HIV-1 during primary infection. FLSC R/T-IgG1 was expressed from a(More)
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