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How stem cells generate both differentiating and self-renewing daughter cells is unclear. Here, we show that Drosophila larval neuroblasts-stem cell-like precursors of the adult brain-regulate proliferation by segregating the growth inhibitor Brat and the transcription factor Prospero into only one daughter cell. Like Prospero, Brat binds and cosegregates(More)
Cohesin is a protein complex that is required to hold sister chromatids together. Cleavage of the Scc1 subunit of cohesin by the protease separase releases the complex from chromosomes and thereby enables the separation of sister chromatids in anaphase. In vertebrate cells, the bulk of cohesin dissociates from chromosome arms already during prophase and(More)
  • Antoine H.F.M. Peters, Dónal O'Carroll, Harry Scherthan, Karl Mechtler, Stephan Sauer, Christian Schöfer +8 others
  • 2001
Histone H3 lysine 9 methylation has been proposed to provide a major "switch" for the functional organization of chromosomal subdomains. Here, we show that the murine Suv39h histone methyltransferases (HMTases) govern H3-K9 methylation at pericentric heterochromatin and induce a specialized histone methylation pattern that differs from the broad H3-K9(More)
  • Christian G Riedel, Vittorio L Katis, Yuki Katou, Saori Mori, Takehiko Itoh, Wolfgang Helmhart +11 others
  • 2006
Segregation of homologous maternal and paternal centromeres to opposite poles during meiosis I depends on post-replicative crossing over between homologous non-sister chromatids, which creates chiasmata and therefore bivalent chromosomes. Destruction of sister chromatid cohesion along chromosome arms due to proteolytic cleavage of cohesin's Rec8 subunit by(More)
At the onset of anaphase, a caspase-related protease (separase) destroys the link between sister chromatids by cleaving the cohesin subunit Scc1. During most of the cell cycle, separase is kept inactive by binding to an inhibitory protein called securin. Separase activation requires proteolysis of securin, which is mediated by an ubiquitin protein ligase(More)
EB1 (end binding 1) proteins have emerged as central regulators of microtubule (MT) plus ends in all eukaryotes, but molecular mechanisms controlling the activity of these proteins are poorly understood. In this study, we show that the budding yeast EB1 protein Bim1p is regulated by Aurora B/Ipl1p-mediated multisite phosphorylation. Bim1p forms a stable(More)
Sister chromatid cohesion is essential for chromosome segregation and is mediated by cohesin bound to DNA. Cohesin-DNA interactions can be reversed by the cohesion-associated protein Wapl, whereas a stably DNA-bound form of cohesin is thought to mediate cohesion. In vertebrates, Sororin is essential for cohesion and stable cohesin-DNA interactions, but how(More)
Cohesin establishes sister-chromatid cohesion from S phase until mitosis or meiosis. To allow chromosome segregation, cohesion has to be dissolved. In vertebrate cells, this process is mediated in part by the protease separase, which destroys a small amount of cohesin, but most cohesin is removed from chromosomes without proteolysis. How this is achieved is(More)
Centrosomes act as sites of microtubule growth, but little is known about how the number and stability of microtubules emanating from a centrosome are controlled during the cell cycle. We studied the role of the TACC3-XMAP215 complex in this process by using purified proteins and Xenopus laevis egg extracts. We show that TACC3 forms a one-to-one complex(More)
Cohesion between sister chromatids is established during S phase and maintained through G2 phase until it is resolved in anaphase (for review, see [1-3]). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a complex consisting of Scc1, Smc1, Smc3, and Scc3 proteins, called "cohesin," mediates the connection between sister chromatids. The evolutionary conserved yeast protein Eco1(More)