Karin Markenroth Bloch

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This paper deals with the problem of tracking cardiac motion and deformation using velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging. We expand upon an earlier described method and fit a spatiotemporal motion model to measured velocity data. We investigate several different spatial elements both qualitatively and quantitatively using phantom measurements and data(More)
BACKGROUND Phase-contrast velocity images often contain a background or baseline offset error, which adds an unknown offset to the measured velocities. For accurate flow measurements, this offset must be shown negligible or corrected. Some correction techniques depend on replicating the clinical flow acquisition using a uniform stationary phantom, in order(More)
PURPOSE To compare absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimates obtained by model-free arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI), corrected for partial volume effects (PVEs). METHODS CBF was measured using DSC-MRI and model-free ASL (quantitative signal targeting with alternating radiofrequency labeling of arterial(More)
BACKGROUND Despite the large availability of 3T MR scanners and the potential of high field imaging, this technical platform has yet to prove its usefulness in the cardiac MR setting, where 1.5T remains the established standard. Global perfusion of the left ventricle, as well as the coronary flow reserve (CFR), can provide relevant diagnostic information,(More)
BACKGROUND Respiratory gating is often used in 4D-flow acquisition to reduce motion artifacts. However, gating increases scan time. The aim of this study was to investigate if respiratory gating can be excluded from 4D flow acquisitions without affecting quantitative intracardiac parameters. METHODS Eight volunteers underwent CMR at 1.5 T with a 5-channel(More)
BACKGROUND Quantitative blood flow and aspects of regional myocardial function such as myocardial displacement and strain can be measured using phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (PC-CMR). Since a gadolinium-based contrast agent is often used to measure myocardial infarct size, we sought to determine whether the contrast agent affects(More)
PURPOSE Arterial partial-volume effects (PVEs) often hamper reproducible absolute quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) obtained by dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). The aim of this study was to examine whether arterial PVEs in DSC-MRI data can be minimized by rescaling the arterial input function (AIF)(More)