Learn More
Epiboly, the spreading of the blastoderm over the large yolk cell, is the first morphogenetic movement of the teleost embryo. Examining this movement as a paradigm of vertebrate morphogenesis, we have focused on the epiboly arrest mutant half baked (hab), which segregates as a recessive lethal, including alleles expressing zygotic-maternal dominant (ZMD)(More)
Transcriptional dysregulation is a central pathogenic mechanism in Huntington's disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder associated with polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. In this study, we show that mutant Htt alters the normal expression of specific mRNA species at least partly by disrupting the binding activities of many(More)
Intensive scientific research devoted in the recent years to understand the molecular mechanisms or neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are identifying new pathways and targets providing new insights and a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis in these diseases. In this consensus manuscript, the authors discuss their current(More)
A large, non-coding ATTCT repeat expansion causes the neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10). In a subset of SCA10 patients, interruption motifs are present at the 5' end of the expansion and strongly correlate with epileptic seizures. Thus, interruption motifs are a predictor of the epileptic phenotype and are hypothesized to(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a noncoding ATTCT pentanucleotide expansion. An inverse correlation between SCA10 expansion size and age at onset has been reported, and genetic anticipation has been documented. Interruptions in the ATTCT expansion are known to occur within the expansion.(More)
The main clinical manifestations of the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) result from the involvement of the cerebellum and its connections. Cerebellar activity has been consistently observed in functional imaging studies of olfaction, but the anatomical pathways responsible for this connection have not yet been elucidated. Previous studies have demonstrated(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is the result of a non-coding, pentanucleotide repeat expansion within intron 9 of the Ataxin 10 gene. SCA10 patients present with pure cerebellar ataxia; yet, some families also have a high incidence of epilepsy. SCA10 expansions containing penta- and heptanucleotide(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, is caused by the expansion of the non-coding ATTCT pentanucleotide repeat in the ATAXIN 10 gene. To date, all cases of SCA10 are restricted to patients with ancestral ties to Latin American countries. Here, we report on a SCA10 patient with Sioux Native American ancestry and no(More)
In Huntington's disease (HD; MIM ID #143100), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, transcriptional dysregulation is a key pathogenic feature. Histone modifications are altered in multiple cellular and animal models of HD suggesting a potential mechanism for the observed changes in transcriptional levels. In particular, previous work has suggested an(More)
Brain size is precisely regulated during development and involves coordination of neural progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The adapter protein ShcA transmits signals from receptor tyrosine kinases via MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) and PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/Akt(More)