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UPC is a parallel extension of the C programming language intended for multiprocessors with a common global address space. A descendant of Split-C [CDG 93], AC [CaDr 95], and PCP [BrWa 95], UPC has two primary objectives: 1) to provide efficient access to the underlying machine, and 2) to establish a common syntax and semantics for explicitly parallel(More)
Acknowledgments Many scientists have contributed to the ideas and concepts behind these specifications. They are too many to mention here, but we would like to cite the contributions of who have contributed to the initial UPC language concepts and specifications. We also would like to acknowledge the role of the participants in the first UPC workshop, held(More)
PCP is an implementation of the split-join parallel programming paradigm for the C programming language. In the split-join paradigm a team of processors executes the user program from main() to exit(). The model allows for exploitation of nested parallelism via a mechanism called team splitting. All of the features of PCP are block structured and allow for(More)
Acknowledgments Many scientists have contributed to the ideas and concepts behind these specifications. They are too many to mention here, but we would like to cite the contributions of David who have contributed to the initial UPC language concepts and specifications. We also would like to acknowledge the role of the participants in the first UPC workshop,(More)
In this paper we examine the use of a shared memory programming model to address the problem of portability of application codes between distributed memory and shared memory architectures. We do this with an extension of the Parallel C Preprocessor. The extension, borrowed from Split-C and AC, uses type qualifiers instead of storage class modifiers to(More)
A parallel algorithm for finding the inverse of the matrix using Gauss Jordan method in OpenMP. The Gauss Jordan method has been chosen for this project because it provides a direct method for obtaining inverse matrix and requires approx. 50% fewer operations unlike other methods. Hence forth it is suitable for massive parallelization. Then, authors have(More)
OpenMP is a widely adopted standard for threading directives across compiler implementations. The standard is very successful since it provides application writers with a simple, portable programming model for introducing shared memory parallelism into their codes. However, the standards do not address key issues for supporting that programming model in(More)