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ÐThis paper introduces GRASP (Generic seaRch Algorithm for the Satisfiability Problem), a new search algorithm for Propositional Satisfiability (SAT). GRASP incorporates several search-pruning techniques that proved to be quite powerful on a wide variety of SAT problems. Some of these techniques are specific to SAT, whereas others are similar in spirit to(More)
Much research in the area of constraint processing has recently been focused on extracting small unsatisfiable “cores” from unsatisfiable constraint systems with the goal of finding minimal unsatisfiable subsets (MUSes). While most techniques have provided ways to find an approximation of an MUS (not necessarily minimal), we have developed a sound and(More)
A Boolean-based router expresses the routing constraints as a Boolðean function which is satisfiable if and only if the layout is routable. Compared to traditional routers, Boolean-based routers offer two unique features: (1) simultaneous embedding of all nets regardless of net ordering, and (2) ability to demonstrate routing infeasibility by proving the(More)
Optimized solvers for the Boolean Satisfiability (SAT) found many applications in areas such as hardware and software verification, FPGA routing, planning in AI, etc. Further uses are complicated by the need to express " counting constraints " in conjunctive normal form (CNF). Expressing such constraints by pure CNF leads to more complex SAT instances.(More)
Instances of the Boolean satisfiability problem (SAT) arise in many areas of circuit design and verification. These instances are typically constructed from some human-designed artifact, and thus are likely to possess much inherent symmetry and sparsity. Previous work[4] has shown that exploiting symmetries results in vastly reduced SAT solver run times,(More)
Research in algorithms for Boolean satisfiability and their implementations [23, 6] has recently outpaced benchmarking efforts. Most of the classic DIMACS benchmarks [10] can be solved in seconds on commodity PCs. More recent benchmarks take longer to solve because of their large size, but are still solved in minutes [25]. Yet, small and difficult SAT(More)
Research in algorithms for Boolean satisfiability (SAT) and their implementations [45, 41, 10] has recently outpaced benchmarking efforts. Most of the classic DIMACS benchmarks [21] can now be solved in seconds on commodity PCs. More recent benchmarks [54] take longer to solve due of their large size, but are still solved in minutes. Yet, small and(More)
The increasing popularity of SAT and BDD techniques in verification and synthesis encourages the search for additional speed-ups. Since typical SAT and BDD algorithms are exponential in the worst-case, the structure of real-world instances is a natural source of improvements. While SAT and BDD techniques are often presented as mutually exclusive(More)
Many computational tools have recently begun to benefit from the use of the symmetry inherent in the tasks they solve, and use general-purpose graph symmetry tools to uncover this symmetry. However, existing tools suffer quadratic runtime in the number of symmetries explicitly returned and are of limited use on very large, sparse, symmetric graphs. This(More)
In recent years several highly effective algorithms have been proposed for Automatic Test Pattern Generation (ATPG). Nevertheless, most of these algorithms too often rely on different types of heuristics to achieve good empirical performance. Moreover there has not been significant research work on developing algorithms that are robust, in the sense that(More)