Kang-Yang Jih

Learn More
Vx-770 (Ivacaftor), a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug for clinical application to patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), shifts the paradigm from conventional symptomatic treatments to therapeutics directly tackling the root of the disease: functional defects of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel(More)
Cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common lethal genetic diseases, is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a chloride channel that, when phosphorylated, is gated by ATP. The third most common pathogenic mutation, a glycine-to-aspartate mutation at position 551 or G551D,(More)
The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein whose defects cause the deadly genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF), encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies indicate that in the presence of ATP, the two NBDs coalesce into a dimer, trapping an ATP(More)
The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The deletion of the phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508-CFTR) is the most common mutation among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The mutant channels present a severe trafficking defect, and the few channels that reach the(More)
Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ubiquitous proteins found in all kingdoms of life, catalyze substrates translocation across biological membranes using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a unique member of this superfamily in that it functions as an ATP-gated(More)
  • 1