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We consider sequential <i>balls-into-bins</i> processes that randomly allocate <i>m</i> balls into <i>n</i> bins. We analyze two allocation schemes that achieve a close to optimal maximum load of &#8968;<i>m</i>/<i>n</i>&#8969; + 1 and require only <i>O(m)</i> (expected) allocation time. These parameters should be compared with the classic(More)
We consider the problem of fair allocation of indivisible goods where we are given a set I of m indivisible resources (items) and a set P of n customers (players) competing for the resources. Each resource j ∈ I has a same value v j > 0 for a subset of customers interested in j and it has no value for other customers. The goal is to find a feasible(More)
Selfish behavior of nodes of a network such as sensors of a geographically distributed sensor network, each of which owned and operated by a different stakeholder may lead to a game theoretic setting called " selfish routing ". The fact that every node strictly aims at maximizing its own utility can cause degradations of social welfare. An issue of concern(More)
We consider the problem of allocating a set I of m indivisible resources (items) to a set P of n customers (players) competing for the resources. Each resource j ∈ I has a same value vj > 0 for a subset of customers interested in j, and zero value for the remaining customers. The utility received by each customer is the sum of the values of the resources(More)
We study a novel variation of network creation games in which the players (vertices) form a graph by building undirected edges to each other with the goal of reducing their costs of using the network. The model we introduce assumes that a minimal set of nodes with high reachability from others are handed the responsibility of routing the traffic alongside(More)
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