• Publications
  • Influence
Eye movements in reading and information processing: 20 years of research.
  • K. Rayner
  • Psychology
    Psychological bulletin
  • 30 October 1998
TLDR
The basic theme of the review is that eye movement data reflect moment-to-moment cognitive processes in the various tasks examined.
The 35th Sir Frederick Bartlett Lecture: Eye movements and attention in reading, scene perception, and visual search
  • K. Rayner
  • Psychology, Art
    Quarterly journal of experimental psychology
  • 25 June 2009
TLDR
Research on the following topics is reviewed with respect to reading: (a) the perceptual span, (or span of effective vision), (b) preview benefit, (c) eye movement control, and (d) models of eye movements.
The perceptual span and peripheral cues in reading
  • K. Rayner
  • Psychology
    Cognitive Psychology
  • 31 January 1975
Eye movements and the perceptual span in beginning and skilled readers.
  • K. Rayner
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental child psychology
  • 1 April 1986
Toward a model of eye movement control in reading.
TLDR
The authors present several versions of a general model, titled the E-Z Reader model, of eye movement control in reading, which appears to be psychologically plausible and gives a good account of many phenomena in reading.
The E-Z Reader model of eye-movement control in reading: Comparisons to other models
TLDR
An updated version of the E-Z Reader model is provided and it is described how it accounts for basic findings about eye movement control in reading and how the cognitive constructs of this model might map onto this neural architecture.
Eye Guidance in Reading: Fixation Locations within Words
TLDR
In this study a number of descriptive analyses of eye movements in reading were carried out, and the results were supportive of models which suggest that determining where to look next while reading is made on a nonrandom basis.
The effect of word frequency, word predictability, and font difficulty on the eye movements of young and older readers.
TLDR
The E-Z Reader model was used as a platform to evaluate the results, and simulations suggest that lexical processing is slowed in older readers and that, possibly as a result of this, they adopt a more risky reading strategy.
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