• Publications
  • Influence
Storage and recovery of elastic potential energy powers ballistic prey capture in toads
TLDR
The results suggest that central nervous control of ballistic tongue projection in toads likely requires the specification of relatively few parameters and elastic recoil of muscle itself can contribute significantly to the power of ballistic movements.
Do arm postures vary with the speed of reaching?
TLDR
The speed-invariant postures observed in this study are instead consistent with a hypothesized optimization of only the dynamic forces, which would reflect the minimal antigravity torques or the change in muscular forces.
Neuromechanics: an integrative approach for understanding motor control.
TLDR
These studies demonstrate that intrinsic properties of muscle contribute to dynamic stability and control of movement, particularly immediately after perturbations, and proprioceptive feedback reinforces these intrinsic self-stabilizing properties of Muscle.
Is titin a ‘winding filament’? A new twist on muscle contraction
TLDR
The winding filament hypothesis accounts for force enhancement during stretch and force depression during shortening, and provides testable predictions that will encourage new directions for research on mechanisms of muscle contraction.
Evolution of forelimb movement patterns for prey manipulation in anurans.
TLDR
High-speed videography was used to observe forelimb use during feeding in a diverse group of anurans in order to determine the evolution ofForelimb movement patterns among anuran taxa and suggest that scooping and wiping are primitive and have been retained by many frog lineages.
Eccentric contraction: unraveling mechanisms of force enhancement and energy conservation
  • K. Nishikawa
  • Biology
    Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 1 January 2016
TLDR
Novel mechanisms for muscle eccentric contraction based on interactions among myosin, actin and titin are suggested and evolutionary homology is suggested.
A prey-type dependent hypoglossal feedback system in the frog Rana pipiens.
TLDR
The results imply that novel neural circuits may in fact underlie different behaviors even when they seem, superficially, to be relatively similar in the central nervous system.
Functional implications of supercontracting muscle in the chameleon tongue retractors.
TLDR
It is suggested that the chameleon tongue retractor muscles may have evolved supercontractile properties to enable a substantial force to be produced over a wide range of tongue projection distances in their complex three-dimensional habitat.
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