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Acupuncture in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomised trial
TLDR
After 8 weeks of treatment, pain and joint function are improved more with acupuncture than with minimal acupuncture or no acupuncture in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, however, this benefit decreases over time.
St John's wort for depression—an overview and meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials
TLDR
There is evidence that extracts of Hypericum perforatum (St John's wort) are more effective than placebo for the treatment of mild to moderately severe depressive disorders.
Acupuncture for patients with migraine: a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
It is found that acupuncture was no more effective than sham acupuncture in reducing migraine headaches although both interventions were moreeffective than a waiting list control.
Acupuncture in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
Acupuncture was more effective in improving pain than no acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic low back pain, whereas there were no significant differences between acupuncture and minimal acupuncture.
Echinacea for preventing and treating the common cold.
TLDR
The results suggested that some Echinacea preparations may be better than placebo in the prevention and treatment of the common cold, however there is not enough evidence to recommend a specificEchinacea product, or Echinacea preparations for the treatment or prevention of common colds.
Pragmatic randomized trial evaluating the clinical and economic effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic low back pain.
TLDR
Acupuncture plus routine care was associated with marked clinical improvements in these patients and was relatively cost-effective, and nonrandomized patients had more severe symptoms at baseline and showed improvements in back function similar to those seen in randomized patients.
Are the clinical effects of homoeopathy placebo effects? A meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials
TLDR
It is found insufficient evidence from these studies that homoeopathy is clearly efficacious for any single clinical condition, and the hypothesis that the clinical effects of homoeopathic remedies are completely due to placebo is not compatible.
Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis.
TLDR
There is consistent evidence that acupuncture provides additional benefit to treatment of acute migraine attacks only or to routine care, and available studies suggest that acupuncture is at least as effective as, or possibly more effective than, prophylactic drug treatment, and has fewer adverse effects.
St John's wort for major depression.
TLDR
The available evidence suggests that the hypericum extracts tested in the included trials are superior to placebo in patients with major depression; b) are similarly effective as standard antidepressants; c) and have fewer side effects than standard antidepressants.
Are the clinical effects of homeopathy placebo effects? A meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials.
TLDR
It is found insufficient evidence from these studies that homeopathy is clearly efficacious for any single clinical condition, and the hypothesis that the clinical effects of homeopathy are completely due to placebo is not compatible.
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