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Cognitive neuroscience of emotional memory
TLDR
Cognitive neuroscientists have begun to elucidate the psychological and neural mechanisms underlying emotional retention advantages in the human brain, revealing new insights into the reactivation of latent emotional associations and the recollection of personal episodes from the remote past.
Hunger selectively modulates corticolimbic activation to food stimuli in humans.
TLDR
The hypothesis that the amygdala and associated inferotemporal regions are involved in the integration of subjective interoceptive states with relevant sensory cues processed along the ventral visual stream is supported.
A large-scale distributed network for covert spatial attention: further anatomical delineation based on stringent behavioural and cognitive controls.
TLDR
Although the task required attention to be equally shifted to the left and to the right, eight of 10 subjects showed a greater area of activation in the right parietal cortex, consistent with the specialization of the right hemisphere for spatial attention.
Brain Activity during Episodic Retrieval of Autobiographical and Laboratory Events: An fMRI Study using a Novel Photo Paradigm
TLDR
Compared with the controlled laboratory condition, the controlled autobiographical condition elicited greater activity in regions associated with self-referential processing (medial prefrontal cortex), visual/ spatial memory (visual and parahippocampal regions), and recollection (hippocampus).
Remembering one year later: role of the amygdala and the medial temporal lobe memory system in retrieving emotional memories.
TLDR
The role of the amygdala and the medial temporal lobe memory regions in recollection and familiarity of emotional memory after lengthy retention intervals is clarified.
The Large-Scale Neural Network for Spatial Attention Displays Multifunctional Overlap But Differential Asymmetry
TLDR
Both exogenous (based on spatial priming) and endogenous ( based on expectancy cueing) shifts of attention are subserved by a common network of cortical and subcortical regions, however, the differences between the two tasks, especially in the degree of rightward asymmetry, suggests that the pattern of activation within this network may show variations that reflect the specific attributes of the attentional task.
The spatiotemporal dynamics of autobiographical memory: neural correlates of recall, emotional intensity, and reliving.
TLDR
The findings indicate dynamic recruitment of emotion-, memory-, and sensory-related brain regions during remembering and their dissociable contributions to phenomenological features of the memories.
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